Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Falling stomach

  1. Jul 22, 2005 #1
    how come when we fall near the earth, our stomachs lurch, but astronauts in their free-fall state out in orbit feel fine?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 22, 2005 #2

    Janus

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I'd say that it has to do more with acclimation than anything else. On Earth we generally don't fall long enough to get used to the sensation. In orbit the body just adjusts to the new "norm" and eventually just ignores it.
     
  4. Jul 23, 2005 #3

    pervect

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor

    Some astronauts do get space-sickness. Last I heard, in spite of a fair amount of research, nobody has been able to predict which ones will get space-sick and which one's won't. One might think that the short duration free-fall flights in the "vomit comet" would help screen out astronauts that were prone to space-sickness, but apparently this doesn't actually work.

    This is frome a usenet posting from a usually reliable source:

    http://yarchive.net/space/science/spacesickness.html
     
  5. Jul 23, 2005 #4

    Danger

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    This might involve visual stimulae as well as physical situations. I, for instance, am absolutely terrified of heights but will do anything in an aeroplane. There are no reference lines to the ground, so it doesn't feel like being 'high'. Low-g in a plane feels perfectly natural (barely noticeable), but it bugs the hell out of me in an elevator or in those instances when my car leaves the ground briefly. I would expect that to be worse in a space-station environment, where every movement makes your body act like a gyroscope and things that should be on the ground are floating around your head.
     
  6. Jul 27, 2005 #5
    I know the feeling you're talking about, and still get it if the car goes over a hump backed bridge, but I've been skydiving for 30 years, and have never suffered the same sensation, although 10,000 - 13,000 ft is still "near the earth" compared with astronauts.
     
  7. Jul 28, 2005 #6
    If you're skydiving you should spend most of the time at terminal velocity and not accelerating, so you wouldn't get it as badly as an astronaut at least. Interesting that you've never felt it all though.
     
  8. Jul 28, 2005 #7

    Danger

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I will never understand why anyone would voluntarily climb out of a perfectly good aeroplane. :grumpy:

    And you started doing that just about the same time that I started driving them. :biggrin:
     
  9. Jul 28, 2005 #8

    russ_watters

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    There is only one way to gain that understanding... :wink:
     
  10. Jul 28, 2005 #9

    Danger

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    That would involve telepathy, which I don't believe in, because sure as hell I'm never gonna do it myself.
     
  11. Jul 28, 2005 #10

    Mk

    User Avatar

    Those who believe in psycokinesis... raise my hand.
     
  12. Jul 28, 2005 #11

    russ_watters

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    So where do you get that name?
     
  13. Jul 28, 2005 #12

    Danger

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    You don't wanna know. Let's just say that it's earned.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Falling stomach
  1. Skier falling (Replies: 4)

  2. Free Fall (Replies: 1)

  3. Free fall (Replies: 10)

  4. Falling to Earth (Replies: 12)

Loading...