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Fancy a day out in space?

  1. Dec 7, 2009 #1

    mgb_phys

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    The bearded one has unveiled (possibly) the first commercial spaceship.

    http://www.virgingalactic.com/news/item/virgin-galactic-unveils-spaceshiptwo-the-worlds-first-commercial-manned-spaceship/ [Broken]

    Nasa is definitely my favorite for the government agency that needs a kick from the private sector, and if it goes wrong it blows up a few billionaires. Basically no downside!

    They also think it could lead to very low launch prices for microsats

    ps Do you get airmiles?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
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  3. Dec 7, 2009 #2

    turbo

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    He named the craft Eve after his mother. She seemed thrilled in the news-spot earlier tonight. Good for him - I hope he has enough millionaires and billionaires to keep the craft's schedule booked solid.
     
  4. Dec 7, 2009 #3

    russ_watters

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    Agreed, but this isn't it.
    Who thinks that? This comes nowhere close to the energy required for achieving orbit.
    Since it launches and lands at the same spot, I suppose they could award you zero...
     
  5. Dec 7, 2009 #4

    lisab

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    Nope, no air in space. Maybe you can get vacuum miles.
     
  6. Dec 7, 2009 #5
    What's your estimates on the year it costs...$10,000 dollars to go into a low earth orbit "vacation" versus the millions it costs today?
     
  7. Dec 7, 2009 #6

    mgb_phys

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    Still a good start.
    I was trying to find the link to that famous article "how the west wasn't won" where it described how the US would have been colonized if Nasa had been doing it.

    I think their idea was to replace the manned part with a booster rather like the pegasus system and use the mothership/plane to carry it upto altitude before launching.

    Yes they said that about the Kuiper Airborne Observatory - the operations were outsourced to United but you didn't get airmiles with your observing time because it landed at the same place.
     
  8. Dec 7, 2009 #7

    russ_watters

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    Never.
     
  9. Dec 7, 2009 #8

    russ_watters

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    Like jumping on a trampoline is a good start to leaping over buildings like Superman?

    No, it's really not a "good start" towards anything. I'm all for capitalism and I wish Branson all the best (and if I had the money, I'd book a flight), but this is just a self-contained joyride for the super-rich. It has no implications for orbital or even just trans-continental spaceflight.
    Oh, well, perhaps - but the way all the hype reads to me, this is supposed to be a step toward true commercial manned spaceflight. In any case, the mothership idea isn't really all that useful anyway - it doesn't go very high or very fast.
     
  10. Dec 7, 2009 #9

    DaveC426913

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    As Russ points out, this is still the same old straight-up-straight-down trajectory. That puts them about (... let's see ... 0 - 25,000 = ...) 25,000mph too slow.
     
  11. Dec 7, 2009 #10
    Virgin Galactic has competition of course, the Spacex

    www.spacex.com

    which will specialize in commercial satellite launches, and eventually putting people in the low earth orbit.
     
  12. Dec 7, 2009 #11

    FredGarvin

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    Bronson is an idiot. Rutan is milking Bronson for what money he can to keep Scaled Composites running. In the end they are nowhere near a feat even noteworthy of anything NASA has done. Dump on them all you want but they are still the best game in town. Period.
     
  13. Dec 7, 2009 #12

    russ_watters

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    See, this is just what I'm talking about - the type of thing that annoys me. Virgin Galactic and SpaceX are not in competition with each other. Where did you get the idea that they were? SpaceX is a real commercial spaceflight venture, Virgin Galactic is not. What SpaceShip2 does is nowhere close to what the Falcon9 is intended to do. I honestly don't understand the hype behind Virgin Galactic. It's an expensive roller coaster, nothing more.
     
  14. Dec 7, 2009 #13

    Ivan Seeking

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    Not for the average millionaire. This is about space tourism, and Virgin is the only game in town... unless your town is Moscow.

    I heard they already have 300 people signed up.
     
  15. Dec 7, 2009 #14

    DaveC426913

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    What Virgin Galactic will (hopefully) do is popularize spaceflight by putting the idea of it within arm's reach of citizens. It doesn't matter whether this one is real orbital spaceflight, as long as people like the idea and approve money going into commerical spaceflight.
     
  16. Dec 7, 2009 #15

    mgb_phys

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    But not much of a breakthrough.
    SpaceX buys rocket motors from an aerospace company and launches them from cape Canaveral under a guaranteed contract from Nasa .
    Is this any different from Nasa buying rockets from an aerospace company and launching them - other than an accounting trick?
     
  17. Dec 7, 2009 #16

    Ivan Seeking

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    The 65-mile high club. Zero-G babies. What more need be said?
     
  18. Dec 7, 2009 #17

    DaveC426913

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    Not sure if you're being facetious.

    Popularizing = funding.
     
  19. Dec 7, 2009 #18

    Ivan Seeking

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    I was serious about the notion of popular fads. I have no doubt that going to space will be a symbol of social status.

    I also have no doubt that some folks would gladly pay 200K to join the 65-mile high club, in the Biblical sense. :biggrin:
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2009
  20. Dec 8, 2009 #19
    They should wait for the space elevator to be built before taking people to space. That would probably be a lot safer and cheaper. And if you had some extra cash, they can take you from there to the moon for a couple of hours.
     
  21. Dec 8, 2009 #20

    FredGarvin

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    I meant in terms of actually reaching space. Not this idiotic space tourism crud.
     
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