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Faradays law of induction

Ok, I need a lot of help on this one. A single conducting loop of wire has an area of 7.4*10^-2 m^2 and a resistance of 110 ohms. Perpendicular to the plane of the loop is a magnetic field of strength 0.18 T. At what rate (in T/s) must this field change if the induced current in the loop is to be 0.22 A?

So far all I can figure out is that Phi=BA. And I don't think that has anything to do with this problem. :grumpy:

Thanks for any and all help.
 

StatusX

Homework Helper
2,563
1
Well, how do you relate the change in flux to the induced EMF? And once you have that, just use ohm's law to get the current.
 
1,444
2
you should know these formulae from your text

flux [tex] \Phi = \int B dA Cos \theta[/tex]
and induced emf [tex] E = \frac{d \Phi}{dt} [/tex]
and also the induced Emf is just live a voltage really so E = IR.

now try and rearrange these equatios to solve
 

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