Faster Than Light Propulsion

In summary, the conversation discusses the theoretical work of Alcubierre, Krasnikov, Thorne, and others in the field of Wormholes and warp drives. The topic of string theory based FTL drives is also brought up, with a mention of Michio Kaku's explanation of an idea proposed by Richard Gott in 1991. This idea involves using cosmic strings to create a contracted space, allowing a spacecraft to potentially accelerate faster than light according to an external observer.
  • #1
robousy
334
1
You are all probably familiar with the theoretical work of Alcubierre, Krasnikov, Thorne etc in the field of Wormholes and warp drives.

Anyone know of any string theory based FTL drives?
 
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  • #2
In Michio Kaku's new book, Parallel Worlds, Kaku explains an idea that was proposed by Richard Gott in 1991 where a spacecraft could circle two cosmic strings as they collided/passed each other (or wrap a single cosmic string in a sort of incomplete square so that two 'sides' of the square would rush towards each other due to their gravitational attraction, which would be the same as two separate cosmic strings). The resulting space around the colliding strings is contracted, allowing the spacecraft to accelerate faster than light according to an external observer, though not exceed the speed of light according to the space craft's frame of reference.
 
  • #3


There are various theories and concepts in string theory that have been proposed as possible mechanisms for faster-than-light (FTL) propulsion. One such concept is the "warp drive," which uses the warping of space-time to achieve FTL travel. This idea was first proposed by Miguel Alcubierre and has gained a lot of attention in the scientific community. However, there are still many challenges and limitations to be overcome in order for this concept to become a viable means of FTL propulsion.

Another theory that has been proposed in string theory is the "wormhole drive," which involves creating and utilizing wormholes to travel through space-time. This idea was first explored by Igor Novikov and has been further developed by other researchers. However, like the warp drive, there are many technical and theoretical challenges that need to be addressed before this concept can become a reality.

It's important to note that while these theories are based on string theory, they are still highly speculative and have not been proven or tested. The concept of FTL travel is still in the realm of science fiction and it may be some time before we have the technology and understanding to make it a reality. In the meantime, scientists continue to explore and refine these ideas, and who knows, perhaps one day we will have the capability to travel faster than the speed of light.
 

1. How does faster than light propulsion work?

Faster than light propulsion is a theoretical concept that involves traveling at speeds greater than the speed of light, which is approximately 299,792,458 meters per second. Currently, there is no known technology or scientific theory that can explain how this would be possible. However, some theories suggest using concepts like wormholes or manipulating space-time to achieve faster than light travel.

2. Is faster than light propulsion possible?

At this point in time, faster than light propulsion is not possible according to our current understanding of physics. The theory of relativity, proposed by Albert Einstein, states that nothing can travel faster than the speed of light. However, scientists continue to research and explore different ideas and theories that could potentially lead to advancements in this area.

3. What are the potential benefits of faster than light propulsion?

Faster than light propulsion could potentially revolutionize space travel by significantly reducing the time it takes to travel vast distances in the universe. This could open up opportunities for interstellar exploration, colonization, and resource extraction. It could also have significant implications for communication and transportation on Earth.

4. Are there any risks or drawbacks to faster than light propulsion?

One of the main concerns about faster than light propulsion is the potential for paradoxes and violations of causality. For example, traveling faster than light could allow someone to go back in time and alter events that have already happened, leading to paradoxes. Additionally, there could be unforeseen consequences in terms of physical effects on the human body or the environment.

5. When can we expect to see faster than light propulsion become a reality?

It is difficult to predict when, or even if, faster than light propulsion will become a reality. It largely depends on advancements in technology and a better understanding of the laws of physics. Some scientists believe that it may be possible in the distant future, while others are more skeptical. In the meantime, research and experimentation in this area continue to push the boundaries of our knowledge and capabilities.

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