Fastest Wave Frequency?

  • #1
FeDeX_LaTeX
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Hello;

What is the fastest possible wave frequency? And is it possible for there to be a frequency faster than the frequency of a gamma ray? What has happened to humans subjected to wave frequencies higher than gamma rays?

Thanks.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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Hello;

What is the fastest possible wave frequency? And is it possible for there to be a frequency faster than the frequency of a gamma ray? What has happened to humans subjected to wave frequencies higher than gamma rays?

Thanks.

(answered respectively)

There isn't any reason to believe there is one.

Yup. Faster gamma rays, or ultra high energy cosmic rays.

After everything is said and done, DNA is destroyed (as well as a number of other problems) causing cells to die.
 
  • #3
FeDeX_LaTeX
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Oh, ok, thanks for clearing that up.

It's just that someone told me if you transmitted a wave frequency that was high enough toward someone, it could cause a cerebral hemorrhage.
 
  • #4
FeDeX_LaTeX
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If this is true, are high frequency waves therefore used by the military?
 
  • #5
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If this is true, are high frequency waves therefore used by the military?

Well, anything technologically feasible is often tested by the military. Whether it's "deployed' is another matter.
I recall the "Star Wars" program, which was cancelled. It was alluded in the media and other public sources that some aspects involved extremely high frequency waves. However, this technology was with respect to missles and electronic infrastructures... not humans.

As you probably know, microwaves have been tested and deployed for military use against humans. But that's probably a much lower frequency than you are referring to with "high frequency"

Edit: I found a 368 page pdf file that might interest you.
http://www.ndu.edu/ctnsp/Nielsen-EDEW.pdf
 
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  • #6
sophiecentaur
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Are we talking sound or electromagnetic waves here?
The ionising properties of em waves don't change much, once you are at xRay frequencies. However, as the energy per photon increases, you get fewer photons per Watt, intercepted by your body. You would, therefore expect less damage from an equivalent exposure to higher frequencies (same energy flux density).

Ultra sound travels really badly through air (absorbed) so it would be a poor weapon at long range. Infra sound (sub-sonic) can seriously upset peoples' brains - but, as it is difficult to direct the energy, it can turn round and bite your own troops.
 
  • #7
FeDeX_LaTeX
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Okay.

So do they use weapons such as sub-sonic waves by transmitting them through pylons that would be situated around an encampment? When you say "seriously upset peoples' brains" how so?

Thanks for replying!
 
  • #8
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Okay.

So do they use weapons such as sub-sonic waves by transmitting them through pylons that would be situated around an encampment? When you say "seriously upset peoples' brains" how so?

Thanks for replying!

Yeah, it can cause severe, non-damaging, temporary mental confusion.
A "flash-bang" grenade used in SWAT teams would be an example.
 
  • #9
FeDeX_LaTeX
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I see... so let's say that if I had a pole emitting sub-sonic waves toward an ideal gas, what would happen to the particles in the gas? Would they begin to move apart because of the wave or would they simply absorb the wave?
 
  • #10
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Not that it matters, but I think I described the flash-bang grenade wrong.
I believe it's massive sensory overload of the sight and ears which causes the disorientation, not a sub-sonic effect. Sorry.

Anyway to your question: "Would they begin to move apart because of the wave or would they simply absorb the wave?" I don't know.
I speculate that the ideal gas would function as a medium for wave propagation. There is always some absorption, which is why any sound eventually dies out.
 
  • #11
sophiecentaur
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I am not sure that a "pole" or "pylon" would launch much sub-sonic sound energy because you need quite a large object ('loudspeaker') to radiate at 10Hz or so. I believe I have read that horns and Helmholtz resonators are used. These structures tend to be pretty non-directional as they are only a fraction of a wavelength in size.

Also, an "ideal gas" is small and can't be polarised or interact with each other in any other way than with an elastic collision so the molecules would simply carry the wave in the same way that they carry any sound wave.
 

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