Favorite movie ending

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  • #26
robphy
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  • #27
Danger
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FredGarvin said:
Absanively (if you're talking about the David Jansen one).
That is indeed the one. I can't hear 'Three Little Fishies' without seeing that stand-off and the Mustang flash-backs. :biggrin:

And while I appreciate the loyalty, you don't have to agree with me every single time. Sometimes I make stuff up just to see if you're paying attention.
 
  • #28
berkeman
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I'd have to say the end of "The Jagged Edge". That movie really had me going back and forth about whether Bridges was the murder or not. I won't spoil the ending for those of you who haven't seen it -- worth watching IMO.
 
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The ending part of 'Leon'.
 
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DaveC426913
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DaveC426913 said:
SE7EN put me off psycho killer movies forever. It was the seminal moment where I realized that I was no longer the target audience
Curious3141 said:
Why?
Se7en was a celebration of human suffering. It reveled in the pain of the victims, examining it in excruciating detail. Not that Se7en is unique in this, but this movie did it for no morally-justifiable reason. What I mean by that is that, in the end, the bad-guy won - there was no moral message to the movie, no lesson to be learned, no coming out of the movie a better person than you went in.

This can be said of any gore/slasher movie, but Se7en was not a gore/slasher movie. Gore/slashers are not meant to be taken seriously - they're simply dark entertainment. Texas Chainsaw massacre etc. are a genre unto themselves and you go in suspending your mores.

Se7ev dragged your morals in with you, set everything up in a realistic world for you to judge good and evil, and then simply showed suffering. It is difficult for a person to comew out of the film without being polluted by it - and not in a good way.



It was the realization that I no longer had the need to be stimulated this way that caused me to forego psycho killer stuff thereafter. I've seen enough of the world now that I don't need to get my pain and suffering artificially. It doesn't mean I don't happily watch movies of all types - eg. I absolutely loved Kill Bill and Sin City (they were cartoons, not drama). But Se7en was bereft of all the elements that put suffering in context.

I guess, to use a (bizarre) pr0n analogy, I have lost interest in the glaring, faceless sexual-zombie extreme-closeup explicitness of Hustler, and have come to prefer the more subtle and alluring, teasing eroticism of Playboy.
 
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  • #31
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Bladibla said:
The ending part of 'Leon'.
yep ,that one was good.

and the ending of life of brian was also great.

hoodwinked had a nice ending too.

hmm... snatch was good too.

and howcome no one mantioned fight club???
i think this one deserves the title.
all the big coorporation buildings, banks, credit card companies, being blown up with "where is my mind" playing in the background after he shot himself in the head to get rid of his split personality... i love this scene!
 
  • #32
"The Chronicles of Riddick" had a sweet ending. The movie ruled all around but especially the final scenes.
 
  • #33
Curious3141
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DaveC426913 said:
Se7en was a celebration of human suffering. It reveled in the pain of the victims, examining it in excruciating detail. Not that Se7en is unique in this, but this movie did it for no morally-justifiable reason. What I mean by that is that, in the end, the bad-guy won - there was no moral message to the movie, no lesson to be learned, no coming out of the movie a better person than you went in.

This can be said of any gore/slasher movie, but Se7en was not a gore/slasher movie. Gore/slashers are not meant to be taken seriously - they're simply dark entertainment. Texas Chainsaw massacre etc. are a genre unto themselves and you go in suspending your mores.

Se7ev dragged your morals in with you, set everything up in a realistic world for you to judge good and evil, and then simply showed suffering. It is difficult for a person to comew out of the film without being polluted by it - and not in a good way.



It was the realization that I no longer had the need to be stimulated this way that caused me to forego psycho killer stuff thereafter. I've seen enough of the world now that I don't need to get my pain and suffering artificially. It doesn't mean I don't happily watch movies of all types - eg. I absolutely loved Kill Bill and Sin City (they were cartoons, not drama). But Se7en was bereft of all the elements that put suffering in context.

I guess, to use a (bizarre) pr0n analogy, I have lost interest in the glaring, faceless sexual-zombie extreme-closeup explicitness of Hustler, and have come to prefer the more subtle and alluring, teasing eroticism of Playboy.
Interesting. We had a thread that went along these lines where marlon and I ended up defending horror movies and psych thrillers against some other posters. That thread quickly became acrimonious and got locked. Interestingly one of the people posting in that thread said nearly the exact same thing you're saying now about Seven.

Personally, I loved Seven. In terms of the way the film is crafted, it's nearly perfect. It doesn't overdo the visual gore, in that sense, it is an artistic movie.

It *is* meant to be a disturbing movie, and I think, from the way you reacted to the material, it achieved it's purpose. But I believe there were lessons the film was trying to convey : firstly, that sometimes (often?) in life, evil does triumph over good and secondly, that we shouldn't give up on life just because it happens, we should continue to fight evil (Somerset's closing words, quoting Hemingway).

Those are some of the most honest lessons a movie could possibly impart, because they ring so true. It's what we see everyday with our own eyes. Would you rather see a fairy tale with a happy ending or a contrived over-the-top morality play like most of the insipid slasher movies out there?

Actually, I do like a good fairy tale ending myself, but when the rare movie comes along with a straight hitting punch, that makes me appreciate it all the more. Seven was just one of those rare movies which didn't compromise.
 
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  • #34
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There are so many great endings I agree with Riddick, Life of Brian, Fight Club but it seems we all like movies with a twist. Almost a Citizen Cane or The Sting type ending where the whole story comes down to a single summary line. How long has this been going on? Probably since "Frankly, my dear I don't give a damn!"
 

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