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Felix Baumgartner and 120,000ft

  1. Oct 12, 2012 #1
    Why only 120,00ft? How much higher could he go before he is like 5,000ft from leaving the atmospshere never to return again?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 12, 2012 #2

    jhae2.718

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    120,000 ft is already about twice the Kármán line, and right in the thermosphere. For reference, the ISS orbits in the thermosphere.
     
  4. Oct 13, 2012 #3

    russ_watters

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    The question makes little sense: the atmosphere doesn't have a defined boundary from which to measure being 5,000 ft below it.
     
  5. Oct 13, 2012 #4

    Drakkith

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    He is in a balloon, not a rocket. He cannot leave the atmosphere and not come back.
     
  6. Oct 13, 2012 #5
    So why not just go as high as possible and then jump? Why stop at 120,000 ft?
     
  7. Oct 13, 2012 #6

    Drakkith

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    Dunno. His balloon may not be capable of going any higher for one. I'm sure there are other issues involved at increasing altitude.
     
  8. Oct 13, 2012 #7
    maybe his suit is also only rated for a certain height or something
     
  9. Oct 13, 2012 #8

    Astronuc

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    It may be a matter of duration - how long it takes to get there, then fall.

    I would love to do that!

    I'd settle for a wingsuit from the top of the clouds.
     
  10. Oct 13, 2012 #9

    dlgoff

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    That beard would cause some unstable flight dynamics I think. :smile:
     
  11. Oct 13, 2012 #10
    I think your math is a little off. 120k ft is just over 36km, the karman line is 100 km. That puts him below the mesosphere and into the stratosphere.
     
  12. Oct 14, 2012 #11

    jhae2.718

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    You're right; in fact it's more than a little off. That's what I get for doing arithmetic in my head instead of MATLAB. Somehow I translated 62 mi into 62,000 ft.
     
  13. Oct 14, 2012 #12
  14. Oct 14, 2012 #13

    arildno

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    Dearly Missed

    God did not intend Man to do this.
    In fact, God didn't intend Man to anything since one of them doesn't exist.
    This stunt won't improve that situation.

    When people wish to die by falling, they ought to have the courtesy to let their death scream precede them, rather than postcede them.
     
  15. Oct 14, 2012 #14

    Ryan_m_b

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    The jump is due any moment now, BBC news 24 is focused on it.
     
  16. Oct 14, 2012 #15
    that was pretty awesome

    I'm really glad he made it safe
     
  17. Oct 14, 2012 #16
    Did he break the speed of sound?

    He should have went higher and tried to break the speed of light.
     
  18. Oct 14, 2012 #17
    Just saw it now , he didn't manage to break the world record i think because he deployed his parachute at 4 min 19 seconds.
     
  19. Oct 14, 2012 #18
    I believe that he broke Kittinger's record for 614 mph freefall speed, but spent less time free falling.

    I think he got to like 729 mph? Though of course I guess they have to verify it however they do that.
     
  20. Oct 14, 2012 #19
    I think he got a little higher than that about 800+ but he slowed down afterwards.
     
  21. Oct 14, 2012 #20

    Borek

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    There was a great moment when he regained the control - there was a moment when he was spinning faster and faster, but apparently the air density got high enough and in a split second he had things under control and was flying head first.

    Nobody commented on that in Polish TV where I watched the jump, apparently they had no idea what they were seeing.
     
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