Fermi Interaction of Electrons with Nuclei

In summary, the Fermi-contact interaction of electrons with nuclei leads to hyperfine splitting and line splitting. It is not related to stability.
  • #1
Winga
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Fermi Contact Interaction of Electrons with Nuclei

About this interaction, is it the spins of nuclei which interact with the spins of electrons?

So, if I draw the magnetic field line from the left nucleus via the pair of e- to the right nucleus and there is not anti-parallel field against it, this state will become stable, vice versa?
 

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  • #2
Like this!
 

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  • #3
I am not sure about your question. Are you referring to the Fermi-Breit contact interaction between the magnetic moments of the nucleus and an electron?
This leads to hyperfine splitting and is not related to stability.
It leads to line splitting with the parallel spin state lying lower.
 
  • #4
Yes, this is what I want to know.

Actually, I have a problem about the principal of NMR, which is the spin-spin coupling/J-coupling.

I find that some reference books have not told that the spin interaction between two nuclei is via bonding electrons.

From Fermi-contact interaction, the two adjacent nuclei with parallel spin will raise in energy while they are anti-parallel to each other will lower the energy. So, what is this energy belongs to?
The nucleus/nuclei, the system...
 

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  • #5
In this case, there are 3 nuclei and 2 bonds.

I don't understand what is exchange interaction, and what is the orientation of magnetic moment of the middle nucleus should be?
 

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  • #6
In molecular systems, the F-B contact interaction I described, if between two nucleii, is completely negligible. You must be thinking of a more complicated long range spin interaction mediated, as you say by electrons. This is something else I am not familiar with. Sorry, I can't help you on that.
 
  • #7
i have learned abt hyperfine interactions but not the mediated kind. Can you kindly let us know which book you are using? i would like to find out abt it too.
 

1. What is Fermi Interaction of Electrons with Nuclei?

Fermi interaction is a type of weak interaction that occurs between electrons and nuclei in an atom. It is responsible for beta decay, where a neutron in the nucleus of an atom transforms into a proton, emitting an electron and an anti-neutrino.

2. How was Fermi Interaction discovered?

Fermi interaction was first proposed by Italian physicist Enrico Fermi in the 1930s. He observed that some elements emit electrons during radioactive decay, and he developed a theory to explain this process.

3. What is the role of electrons in Fermi Interaction?

Electrons play a crucial role in Fermi Interaction as they are the particles that are emitted during beta decay. They are also involved in the weak force that mediates the interaction between the neutron and the proton in the nucleus.

4. How does Fermi Interaction affect the stability of atoms?

Fermi Interaction plays a significant role in the stability of atoms, as it is responsible for beta decay, which can change the number of protons and neutrons in the nucleus. This can affect the stability of the atom, making it more or less likely to undergo further decay.

5. How is Fermi Interaction relevant in nuclear energy production?

In nuclear reactors, Fermi Interaction is used to control the rate of fission reactions. By manipulating the number of neutrons in the nucleus through beta decay, scientists can regulate the energy released during fission and use it to generate electricity.

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