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Fictious anti gravity question.

  1. Jun 5, 2012 #1
    Fictious meaning that we doen't have anything, as of yet, that can levitate not above a mechanism that aids in its aparent floating capability. Such as a levitating spining top and the base that it needs to float on. Or an electomagnet that turns on and off repeadedly to give the illusion of foating, which I find is more suspension than levitation. No, I'm taking about a free floating platform of sorts that you can stand on, ballanced. And perhaps when you should tilt your head one way or the other you would then be tipping yourself off of the center of gravity so that you would be able to experience locamotion.

    My question would be if a person is independent of Earths rotation. Would that person then be standing still as the Earth rotates underneath? This would be 1000.7 km/h at the equator in an west to east direction and going in a tight circle at the poles. Yes? I hope that this is not the case....
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2012
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 5, 2012 #2

    russ_watters

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    You mean like a helicopter?
     
  4. Jun 5, 2012 #3
    Absolutely, That never came to mind. Like the helicopter floats on air, independent of Earth.
    Thanks.
     
  5. Jun 5, 2012 #4

    berkeman

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    Except that the air is connected to the Earth (it is rotating with the Earth), so it is not independent of the Earth.
     
  6. Jun 5, 2012 #5
    Good point, So then would it be entirely possible to have a strong enough electromagnetic pluse or sucessive pulses, that would be directed to a diamagnetic material such as water. To levitate over? What type of form would this pulse be or better yet, what if any would be expected to happen to the waters' surface. Since its' being induced into a bouant, diamagnetic. If I undersatnd this train of thought. This would give an equal, and opposite force that it originated from. In therory would that be correct?
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2012
  7. Jun 5, 2012 #6

    Drakkith

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    While the physics seem to work, the idea is simply unfeasible. See the following article and look at the table that lists the diamagnetic strength of certain materials. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diamagnetism

    Notice that water is at -0.91 and that a superconductor is at -105. This means that a superconductor is repelled from a magnetic field over 100,000 times more strongly than water is. So while you can levitate a small piece of superconducting material over a permanent magnet, the strength of the field you would need to levitate a magnetic platform over water is unimaginably high.
     
  8. Jun 7, 2012 #7
    I thought the helicopter would move together with the rotation of the Earth firstly not because of the air but because it had moved with it while it was standing, and kept its momentum when it lifted off.
     
  9. Jun 8, 2012 #8

    Drakkith

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    Absolutely.
     
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