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Fields of physics?

  1. Mar 9, 2005 #1
    Is there any place I can find a simple guide to the different fields of physics? I'm not sure what I want to go into, since I have no idea what most of those fields are. When googling, I end up getting some university page that has the different physics offered with descriptions like "Quantum Mechanics 1: Basics of Quantum Mechanics". Not really answering my question, you know?

    PL
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 9, 2005 #2

    ZapperZ

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    This website lists all the various units or division under the wing of the American Physical Society. If you click on the drop-down button for the Division Homepages, you will see various divisions that loosely corresponds to the many areas of physics. Each division homepage gives you a brief description (some even more elaborate) of what it is and why it is important.

    http://www.aps.org/units/index.cfm

    Zz.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2005
  4. Mar 9, 2005 #3
    You wouldn't have to worry what fields of physics you would be specializing it until you get to the graduate level though.
     
  5. Mar 9, 2005 #4
    Cool beans. Exactly what I was looking for. :D

    So in undergrad I just learn the basics of everything?

    PL
     
  6. Mar 9, 2005 #5

    ZapperZ

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    Mostly... and a few labs here and there. Depending on where you go to school, you may have a lot of options later on, especially in your Senior year. You may get to choose a more specialized course to take, more advanced lab work, a senior thesis research project, even graduate level courses, if you're so inclined.

    I would suggest that, starting your Junior and into the Senior year, you start attending your department's seminar/colloquium. While most of the stuff will be way over your head, this will expose you to the various kinds of physics research that's going on elsewhere. So while you can basically ignore the physics details, pay attention of what exactly the work is about, how it is done, and WHERE it is done (in case you might want to go there for graduate school).

    Zz.
     
  7. Mar 10, 2005 #6
    Does anyone know about fileds of theoretical physics?
     
  8. Mar 10, 2005 #7

    ZapperZ

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    Theoretical physics is NOT a field of physics. It is a "methodology", as is "experimental physics".

    When you do nuclear physics, for example, there's an experimental aspect, and a theoretical aspect. People doing theoretical nuclear physics do theoretical analysis, phenomenology, modeling, etc.. People doing experimental nuclear physics do experiments, debunk theories, verify theories, discover new stuff, do some phenomenology, etc.

    Zz.
     
  9. Mar 10, 2005 #8
    I thought theoretical physics was a field in itself too. Thanks for clearing that up. :)

    PL
     
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