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Find a curve

  1. Sep 18, 2014 #1
    Eh. I'm not quite sure how to find the curve γ(t). I think that the problem is probably a bit easier being given the parametrization of M. I do know that the point P lies in the xy-plane.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 18, 2014 #2

    BvU

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    Et tu, Shackle: Did you notice PF has a template ?

    I have no clue what you mean with ##v =(\frac{7}{2},2,3) \in T_p(M)##.
    Enlighten me, and all those others who might want to help you...
     
  4. Sep 18, 2014 #3
    It's the tangent plane of M at P.
     
  5. Sep 18, 2014 #4

    BvU

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    Good. While you are explaining anyway, is the v in x(u,v) = (u, v, u2 - v2) also a point in this tangent plane ?
     
  6. Sep 18, 2014 #5
    The v is in the tangent plane, not necessarily in the surface, right?
     
  7. Sep 18, 2014 #6

    BvU

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    My guess is that there are two v floating around in the problem statement, and you need to make a distinction between them. Nice opportunity to catch up with the requirement to make use of the template!

    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data


    2. Relevant equations


    3. The attempt at a solution
     
  8. Sep 18, 2014 #7
    Yes, the v is a vector in the tangent plane, not the parameter v.
     
  9. Sep 18, 2014 #8

    BvU

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    Brilliant evasion of the chore to fill in the template. As if we're among real experts.
    So now you have ##\gamma(0)## as a given, yielding you u(0) and v(0).
    Your turn for ##\gamma'(0)##
     
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