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Find an unusual pattern

  1. Feb 13, 2016 #1

    wolram

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  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 13, 2016 #2
    It's fascinating. There are patterns everywhere. Sometimes I wonder why our brains are so attracted to them. Is there really some mystical power behind them (not necessarily in religious sense) or is it only blind evolution that taught us seeing patterns is useful?
     
  4. Feb 13, 2016 #3

    wolram

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    I find patterns in lots of things, i think that is why i do so well at the iq tests that require one to fit the missing piece into the pattern, i am useless at math.
     
  5. Feb 13, 2016 #4
    Self-organizing systems always exhibit such a beauty as part of a proven record for their adaptability.
     
  6. Feb 13, 2016 #5
    You need more advice and guidance, those people may never tell you, at least at the moment :biggrin:.
     
  7. Feb 13, 2016 #6
    You might be good at fortune telling from coffee, tea leaves or scattered bones :)
     
  8. Feb 13, 2016 #7

    Tsu

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    Beautiful, Wolly!!! I love the patterns in nature. Roses, camellias, heck....absolutely ALL flower patterns! Every last one of them. And leaf and fern patterns.... :approve: Have you ever seen a spotted skunk? Google THAT and check out the many patterns of the spotted skunk! But my favorite is the clouded leopard. https://www.google.com/search?q=clo...hUJwmMKHdMwAhQQ_AUIBigB#imgrc=CbrPqBe67Qk9oM:

    (Hope that link works :oldbiggrin:)

    If you hit the 'prev' button on your link, you'll see the picture that just totally KILLED Space Mountain for me. :oldcry:
     
  9. Feb 13, 2016 #8

    wolram

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    I have to agree with you, the clouded leopard is a fantastic looking animal and does it not blend in to the forest well.
     
  10. Feb 13, 2016 #9

    wolram

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    What beautiful patterns algae have.

    Smaller than a speck of dust, Emiliania huxleyi plays an outsized role in the world's seas. Ranging from the polar oceans to the tropics, these free-floating photosynthetic algae remove carbon dioxide from the air, help supply the oxygen that we breathe, and form the base of marine food chains. When they proliferate, their massive turquoise blooms are visible from space.

    Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-06-genetic-ocean-algae-bacteria-like-flexibility.html#jCp
     
  11. Feb 13, 2016 #10
    There are also some beautiful tarantulas such as this one. Putting her in a spoiler so that someone with arachnophobia doesn't get scared.
    1cd0e9ca122147038bc1e445035d322e.jpg
     
  12. Feb 13, 2016 #11

    Tsu

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    Wow! That's a beautiful tarantula! Where are those found?
     
  13. Feb 13, 2016 #12

    Tsu

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    Never mind. I Wiki'd it. :oldwink:
     
  14. Feb 13, 2016 #13

    Tsu

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    Sophia, is that your pet? I read that they're a mainstay in the pet trade despite their potent venom.
     
  15. Feb 13, 2016 #14

    phinds

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    It's well known that the human brain evolved to recognize patterns, even to the extent of seeing them when there really aren't any, thus our fascination with them. The reason is very simple. If you recognize a somewhat camouflaged predator it may save your life. If you THINK you see a camouflaged predator in a foliage pattern, you may be embarrassed but you won't be dead so our brains see them very readily.
     
  16. Feb 13, 2016 #15
    This one is not mine. They are kept as pets but they are suitable for advanced keepers because they can be a bit aggressive.
    But I'd like to get a tarantula one day because I find them fascinating. I will chose some of the more docile species though.
     
  17. Feb 13, 2016 #16

    Tsu

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    Phinds....is your avatar a Great Pyrenees? Is it yours? I LOVE THEM!!!!! *WANT* :biggrin:
     
  18. Feb 13, 2016 #17

    phinds

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    Yep. It was my wife's for 11 years. Died 2 years ago. TERRIFIC dog if you can put up with the slobber.
     
  19. Feb 13, 2016 #18
    That's a good explanation. I guess it also helped us recognize safe and poisonous plants and mushrooms.
    And on more advanced level, we could see patterns in cause and effect of our actions and natural phenomena.
     
  20. Feb 13, 2016 #19
    I've always thought evolution left our minds with "weak" areas which bypass rationality. I think that's a good friendly definition of mysticism.

    Being subject to such weaknesses, I've never seen evolution as blind.

    I wonder if such weak areas are required for something as complex as the human mind? Or is a perfectly rational mind possible?

    Wood burl.
     
  21. Feb 13, 2016 #20

    Tsu

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    They ARE awesome! A friend of mine had several to guard her sheep. Her indoor/outdoor dog didn't slobber. She said some do, and some don't. I'll take a DON'T cuz I want mine indoor and outdoor too. I'd like to get a rescue dog. I have to wait a bit though. Not sure what my cats will think of it. :biggrin:
     
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