Find electron's acceleration and final velocity

In summary, an electron with a mass of 9.1*10^-31 kg moves a distance of 4.0mm between the electrodes of a cathode-ray tube, accelerated by a net electrical force of 5.6*10^-15 N. Assuming it starts from rest, the acceleration is 6.15*10^15 m/s^2. To find the final velocity, use the formula (v2)^2= (v1)^2 + 2ad, where v1 is the initial velocity (0 m/s) and d is the distance traveled. Alternatively, the work done by the force is equal to the change in kinetic energy, which can also be used to find the final velocity.
  • #1
404
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An electron has a mass of 9.1*10^-31 kg. Between the electrodes of a cathode-ray tube, it moves a distance of 4.0mm, accelerated by a net electrical force of 5.6*10^-15 N. Assuming it started by rest, find it's acceleration and final velocity.

I found the acceleration to be 6.15*10^15 m/s^2, which is confirmed by the answer book, but how can I get the final velocity without change in time? distance don't help at all if I don't know average velocity...
 
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  • #2
u have accel, v1, and distance
use (v2)^2= (v1)^2 + 2ad
 
  • #3
404 said:
An electron has a mass of 9.1*10^-31 kg. Between the electrodes of a cathode-ray tube, it moves a distance of 4.0mm, accelerated by a net electrical force of 5.6*10^-15 N. Assuming it started by rest, find it's acceleration and final velocity.

I found the acceleration to be 6.15*10^15 m/s^2, which is confirmed by the answer book, but how can I get the final velocity without change in time? distance don't help at all if I don't know average velocity...

Force times distance in the direction of the force is work, and that equals change in kinetic energy.

Edit
OOPs.. two suggestions flying at the same time. They both lead to the same conclusion.
 
  • #4
Ok I see, thanks.
 

Related to Find electron's acceleration and final velocity

1. What is an electron's acceleration?

An electron's acceleration is the rate at which its velocity changes over time. It is typically measured in meters per second squared (m/s^2).

2. How can I find an electron's acceleration?

An electron's acceleration can be found by dividing its change in velocity by the change in time. This can be done using the formula: acceleration = (final velocity - initial velocity) / time.

3. What is the final velocity of an electron?

The final velocity of an electron is its velocity at the end of a given period of time. It can be calculated using the formula: final velocity = initial velocity + (acceleration * time).

4. Can I use the same formula to find the acceleration and final velocity of any object?

Yes, the formula for finding acceleration and final velocity can be used for any object, as long as its initial velocity, acceleration, and time are known.

5. How is the acceleration of an electron related to its mass and the force acting on it?

An electron's acceleration is directly proportional to the force acting on it and inversely proportional to its mass. This means that as the force increases, the acceleration will increase, and as the mass increases, the acceleration will decrease.

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