1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Find the angle theta

  1. Oct 17, 2013 #1

    Radarithm

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    A mass m = 5.500 kg is suspended from a string of length L = 1.570 m. It revolves in a horizontal circle (see Figure). The tangential speed of the mass is 2.874 m/s. What is the angle theta between the string and the vertical?
    PIC OF DIAGRAM: http://gyazo.com/fc4a226a7d1a3af6c298b9782de0d7fe


    2. Relevant equations

    a = v2/r

    3. The attempt at a solution

    I am totally stumped. I don't want anyone to give me an answer; all I want is a hint so I can get started on this problem (I assume I'll have to use sin / cos somewhere in the formula). Thanks in advance.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 17, 2013 #2

    CAF123

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Start by drawing a free body diagram for the mass and resolve the forces in the radial and +z direction, +z pointing upwards.
     
  4. Oct 17, 2013 #3

    Radarithm

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I believe the Tension and weight forces cancel with respect to the y direction, that means there is a centripetal force towards the center of the circle in the x direction and since the mass is tilted along an angle theta, then the tension also has an x component. I guess I'm stuck again, maybe that's because its getting late; I'm not sleeping until I solve this problem :P
     
  5. Oct 17, 2013 #4

    CAF123

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    What equations did you get for the two directions?
     
  6. Oct 17, 2013 #5

    Radarithm

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Still didn't get any. I have no idea how to get θ.
    Any tips? :confused:
    I did get this though (and I'm pretty sure its wrong): Fnet = Tx + Fcentripetal cos θ × m(v2/r)
     
  7. Oct 17, 2013 #6

    CAF123

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    It is dimensionally inconsistent, so just by looking at it, it must be incorrect.

    There is a component of tension in the vertical direction. What is this in terms of θ? What other force acts in the vertical direction? Write Newtons second law for this direction.

    There is also a component of tension in the horizontal direction. What is this in terms of θ? This force component is providing the centripetal force required for the mass to revolve. So you may equate this to the general expression for a centripetal force.

    This will give you two equations. What you said was correct in #3, now you have to translate those ideas into equations.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted