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Find the Magnitude

  1. Jul 12, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    A nickel coin has a mass of about 4.3g. Each mole (6.02e23 atoms) has a mass of about 58.2g


    2. Relevant equations
    I found the number of electrons on each coin, which is 1.245e24 and also the number of atoms on the coin which is 4.447e22.

    3. The attempt at a solution
    Now I have to find the magnitude of the charge of all of these electrons. I just started phys part two and need help. I Know that the C constant is, and I think I have to use the F=Q1Q2/r2but I can't come up with the solution
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 12, 2009 #2

    LowlyPion

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    Welcome to PF.

    By C I think you mean the units of charge - Coulomb.

    The formula you show is for the force between charges separated by a distance.

    If you are looking for total charge in C, however, you will want to look up how many electrons makes up a Coulomb.
     
  4. Jul 12, 2009 #3
    Well, I know that C=6.02 x 10^18 electrons, and I have 1.245 x 10^24 electrons, also the problem states that there are 28 electrons/atom on the nickel coin... would I multiply those?
     
  5. Jul 12, 2009 #4

    LowlyPion

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    You might want to use 6.24*1018 electrons/ Coulomb.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coulomb

    As to the 28 per atom, didn't you use that already to determine total electrons?
     
  6. Jul 12, 2009 #5
    yes, that was to find the total electrons
     
  7. Jul 12, 2009 #6

    LowlyPion

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    So if you have total electrons and you know how many are in a Coulomb ...
     
  8. Jul 12, 2009 #7
    I think i have to multiply but I'm not coming out with the right answer
     
  9. Jul 12, 2009 #8

    LowlyPion

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    If I have 48 eggs, and there are 12 eggs in a dozen, and I wanted to know how many dozen I had, ... I wouldn't be multiplying.
     
  10. Jul 12, 2009 #9
    Ok, cool...got it thanks
     
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