Find the pressure p_1 due to a single particle

In summary, the conversation is about finding the pressure due to a single particle in terms of various given quantities. The initial attempt using pV=N(k_b)T was incorrect. The variables k_B, T, L_x, L_y, L_z, and V were defined, and the equation p = kT/V was suggested as a solution. The question of whether this was for mastering physics was raised and confirmed. The concept of moles was discussed and the correct pressure equation for a single particle with squared speed in the x direction was provided. The conversation ends with the need to find the pressure in terms of T, k, V, and other given quantities and a request for the work done for finding the pressure for v_x and
  • #1
~angel~
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0
Please help.

Find the pressure p_1 due to a single particle. Express the pressure due to a single particle in terms of k_B, T, L_x, L_y, L_z, and any other given quantities.

I tried using pV=N(k_b)T, but it is wrong.

Thank you.
 

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  • #2
Care to define those variables?
 
  • #3
k_B is boltzmanns constant. If you look at the picture, you can see that L_x, L_y, and L_z are the length, width and height of the rectangular prism. T is the absolute temperature.
 
  • #4
You can express V in terms of L_x, L_y, L_z
Is this mastering physics?

p = kT/V

No moles here, single particle.
 
  • #5
Yeah, mastering physics. That's what stuffed me up- the moles. Thanks.
 
  • #6
Ok...I've now found the pressure for that, and I also found the pressure fon the wall due to a single particle whose squared speed in the x direction is v_x^2 [the answer to the later is (m*v_x)/V]. Now I need to find the pressure in terms of T, k and V, and any other given quantities, but I can't seem to get it.
 
  • #7
Show me your work for finding the pressure for v_x, and v_x^2.
 
  • #8
p = F/A

The force is equal to dp(momentum)/dt = (2mv_x)/((2*L_x)/(v_x))

Area = Ly*Lz

Therefore, p = (m*v_x)/V
 

1. What is the formula for finding the pressure due to a single particle?

The formula for finding the pressure (p1) due to a single particle is p1 = F1/A, where F1 is the force exerted by the particle and A is the area over which the force is applied.

2. How is the pressure due to a single particle related to the number of particles present?

The pressure due to a single particle is directly proportional to the number of particles present. This means that if the number of particles increases, the pressure due to a single particle also increases.

3. Can the pressure due to a single particle be negative?

No, the pressure due to a single particle cannot be negative. Pressure is a scalar quantity and its value is always positive or zero. If the force exerted by the particle is in the opposite direction of the area over which it is applied, the pressure will be zero.

4. How does the distance between the particle and the surface affect the pressure?

The distance between the particle and the surface does not directly affect the pressure. The pressure is solely determined by the force exerted by the particle and the area over which it is applied. However, the distance may indirectly affect the pressure if it affects the force or the area.

5. Can the pressure due to a single particle be changed?

Yes, the pressure due to a single particle can be changed by altering either the force exerted by the particle or the area over which it is applied. For example, increasing the force will increase the pressure, while increasing the area will decrease the pressure.

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