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Homework Help: Find the resultant velocity

  1. Sep 29, 2010 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    When finding the resultant velocity in a problem what does the resultant stand for

    2. Relevant equations

    ((x2+y2)1/2

    3. The attempt at a solution
    I understand I use the equation above to find the resultant velocity but is the resultant the same thing as displacement and if so why would there be a velocity to it because all displacement has to do with is position??!

    Please someone explain this to me I've asked about 7 people this question today and no one could give me a good answer.
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data



    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 29, 2010 #2

    PhanthomJay

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    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    Re: Resultants

    In your relevant equation, it's ((V_x^2 + (V_y ^2)) ^1/2 = V_resultant. In other words, the resultant velocity is the square root of the sum of the squares of the x and y components of the velocity. Velocity and displacement are mathematically related, but they are not the same.
     
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