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Find the x component for the force parallel using xcos

  1. Oct 12, 2005 #1
    A block weighing 95.0 lbs is on a 34.5 degree plane. Find the force parallel to the plane, the acceleration if there is no friction, the coefficient of friction if the object is just at the point of sliding, and the acceleration if coefficient of sliding friction is .350.
    Do you find the x component for the force parallel using xcos(theta)? I need some help with the rest!
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2005
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 12, 2005 #2

    Gokul43201

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    1. This is an Introductory Physics question.

    2. In "xcosy" what are x and y ? :confused:

    3. You need to study your textbook chapter on resolution of vectors.

    4. There are some tutorials you can look into here : https://www.physicsforums.com/forumdisplay.php?f=151

    PS : It's good practice to use a descriptive title like "block on incline".
     
  4. Oct 12, 2005 #3

    hypnagogue

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    I've moved this from the Advanced Physics forum.
     
  5. Oct 12, 2005 #4
    hey i meant theta but there is no key for that so i substituted y
     
  6. Oct 12, 2005 #5

    Gokul43201

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    Okay, but you still have to tell us what "x" and [itex]\theta[/itex] refer to. Depending on that, your answer (so far) could be right or wrong.

    Please try and communicate all the information, in as clear a manner as possible.
     
  7. Oct 12, 2005 #6

    Gokul43201

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    1. Did you draw the free body diagram ? Do not write down any equations unless you've done this.

    2. What are all the forces acting on the block ? If some of these forces are not acting along a direction parallel or perpendicular to the incline, resolve these forces along these directions.

    3. Apply Newton's Second Law to each direction, after finding the net force in that direction.
     
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