Find Velocity of a long jumper

  • Thread starter dmkeddy
  • Start date
  • #1
5
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Homework Statement



An athlete executing a long jump leaves the ground at an angle of 30 degrees and travels 8.90m. What was the take-off speed?

Homework Equations



d(vertical)=(vi)(t) + 0.5at^2

The Attempt at a Solution



0=Vsin30t + (0.5)(-9.8)(t^2)

I cannot solve for two separate variables, how can I solve this problem?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
2,745
22
EDIT: I see what you've done.

Right, in your attempt, d does not equal 0. There has to be some vertical height.

For horizontal you know:

d = 8.9m

For vertical you know:

a = -9.8 for the ascent and 9.8 for the descent.

You know vf for the ascent = 0 and vi for the descent = 0.
 
Last edited:
  • #3
5
0
that is the vertical, there is no horizontal acceleration
Vertical:
Vi=?
Vf=?
a=-9.8m/s^2
t=?
d=0

Horizontal:
Vave=?
t=?
d=8.90m
 
  • #4
2,745
22
that is the vertical, there is no horizontal acceleration
Vertical:

d=0

d does not equal 0. There has to be vertical height.

The vertical phase is split in two. See previous post for details.

Unless you know the flight time, this question all comes down to the vertical components.
 

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