Finding an antiderivative using substitution rule

  • Thread starter h_k331
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  • #1
h_k331
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I'm trying to find the antiderivative of [sec(2x)tan(2x)], I can't figure out what part I should be substituting. Any help is appreciated.

Thanks,
hk
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Benny
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[tex]
\sec \left( {2x} \right)\tan \left( {2x} \right) = \frac{{\sin \left( {2x} \right)}}{{\cos ^2 \left( {2x} \right)}}
[/tex]

You should be able to finish it off.
 
  • #3
wisredz
111
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replace 2x by u and you have secu 's derivative under the integral sign
 
  • #4
h_k331
33
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I ended up working on it some more and came up with u=sec(2x).
Then (1/2)du=sec(2x)tan(2x)dx. I'm not sure if this is the preferred method but it came out to the correct answer.

hk
 
  • #5
HallsofIvy
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
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Looks good to me!
 
  • #6
h_k331
33
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Thank you for the replys.

hk
 

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