Finding force, distance, time on a threadmill

In summary, you would calculate the distance between your legs and multiply that by the number of steps you take. Additionally, you would calculate the amount of energy conducted away by vaporizing sweat, the amount of energy that has been radiated away by your body during the workout, the amount of heat energy stored in excess body temperature, the amount of food energy used, the amount of heat energy created during the work-out, and the amount of energy stored as excess body heat as your body cools down to normal temperature.
  • #1
Outblaze
11
0
Hello:

I'm trying to find "good" measurement for force, distance and time for a treadmill. I'm assuming the force will simply be the "weight" of my body but the distance..the distance is a different issue altogether.

Since we're contrained in not using the data from the machine, I must use simple devices in my disposal i.e. metre sticks, bathroom scales, stop-watches, etc.

How would I calculate good "distances" assuming I'm not setting the treadmill on an incline (that is, if I don't "have" to set it on an incline).

Can I just calculate the average distance between my legs and multiply that by the number of steps I take?

I must also calculate...

1). Energy conducted away by vaporizing sweat.
2).Energy that has been radiated away by my body during the workout.
3).heat energy stored in excess body temperature.
4). Amount of heat energy lost by convection
5). total food energy used
6). heat energy created during the work-out.

Also, what happens to the energy stored as excess body heat as my body cools down to normal temperature?

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
 
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  • #2
wow, you just can't get an answer out of anyone...

The "weight" issue also worries me because of the fact that it is perpendicular in relation to the distance I'm travelling. But what other force? The force of my legs? Would that mean I have to consider the weight of the leg itself?

energy conducted away by vaporizing sweat...hmm, I would say i should take an initial body weight and final body weight. Difference would give me the amount of heat perspired out of me and that would get me...

the third question seems to be a derivative of the preceeding one...energy radiated away, simply a changing of words?!

total food energy used: get meself the efficiency of leg muscles, but what would output and input be? Should I eat something prior at hand and use that as the "food" I'm tring to burn away?

I'm lost..too many questions.
 
  • #3
It seems I have broken the rules in posting a thread in many areas. I dearly apologize for my mistake and I promise never for that to happen again.
 

Related to Finding force, distance, time on a threadmill

1. How do I calculate the force on a treadmill?

The force on a treadmill can be calculated using the formula F = m x a, where F is the force in Newtons, m is the mass in kilograms, and a is the acceleration in meters per second squared. To find the force on a treadmill, you will need to know the mass of the object on the treadmill and the acceleration at which it is moving.

2. What units are used to measure force on a treadmill?

The SI unit for force is Newtons (N). However, in some cases, force may also be measured in pounds (lbs) or kilograms (kg).

3. How do I calculate the distance traveled on a treadmill?

The distance traveled on a treadmill can be calculated using the formula d = v x t, where d is the distance in meters, v is the velocity in meters per second, and t is the time in seconds. To find the distance traveled, you will need to know the velocity at which the object is moving and the time it has been on the treadmill.

4. What units are used to measure distance on a treadmill?

The SI unit for distance is meters (m). However, in some cases, distance may also be measured in kilometers (km) or miles (mi).

5. How do I calculate the time spent on a treadmill?

The time spent on a treadmill can be calculated by dividing the distance traveled by the velocity. This can be represented by the formula t = d/v, where t is the time in seconds, d is the distance in meters, and v is the velocity in meters per second.

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