1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Finding invariant subspaces

  1. Feb 23, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    Let V be a finite dimensional, nonzero complex vector space. Let T be be a linear map on V. Show that V contains invariant subspaces of dimension j for j=1, ..., dim V.

    2. Relevant equations
    Since V is complex, V contains an invariant subspace of dimension 1.


    3. The attempt at a solution
    I started with dim V=3. Then V contains an invariant subspace of dimension 1.
    Let U1=span{u1} denote this space, and extend this to a basis for V: V=span{u1,v2,v3}.

    What I would like to do is show that span{v2,v3} contains an invariant subspace of dimension 1, span{u2}. Then form the invariant subspace U2=span{u1,u2}.

    But I don't know how to show that span{v2,v3} contains an invariant subspace of dimension 1. I'm not sure that it's even true.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 23, 2009 #2

    Dick

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Did you prove the Schur decomposition? That any complex matrix is similar to an upper triangular matrix?
     
  4. Feb 23, 2009 #3
    I have this theorem:

    If V is a complex vector space and T is a linear map on V, then T has an upper trianguler matrix with respect to some basis of V.

    I think that this is equivalent to the Schur Theorem. I think I know how to proceed from here.

    Choose a basis of V for which the matrix of T is upper triangular. Then the definition of the matrix of a linear map shows that V contains an invariant subspace of dimension j for j=1,...,dim V.

    Is this right?

    Thanks
     
  5. Feb 23, 2009 #4

    Dick

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Sure. The matrix form does make it pretty easy to see the invariant subspaces.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Finding invariant subspaces
  1. Invariant Subspace (Replies: 1)

  2. Invariant Subspaces (Replies: 1)

  3. T-invariant subspaces (Replies: 2)

Loading...