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Finding Normalization Factor

  1. Oct 19, 2012 #1
    How is it that:

    See figure:

    Given: See figure too

    In details, I don't get the maths and simplification that took place!
    Thanks!
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 19, 2012 #2

    dextercioby

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    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Well, what is [exp(-x^2)]^2 equal to ?
     
  4. Oct 19, 2012 #3
    exp(-x^4)
     
  5. Oct 19, 2012 #4

    jtbell

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    Staff: Mentor

    Remember, exp(a) = e^a. So exp(a)exp(a) = (e^a)(e^a) = ... ?
     
  6. Oct 20, 2012 #5
    it is supposed to be e^2a.
    Correct me if am wrong.
     
  7. Oct 20, 2012 #6

    jtbell

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    Staff: Mentor

    Right. So that should tell you what [e^(-x^2)][e^(-x^2)] is.
     
  8. Oct 20, 2012 #7
    woah get your math straight.
    that's not true: exp(a^2) =(e^a)(e^a)
    the integral of exp[-x^2] is defined only from -infinity to infinity.
     
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