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Finding the Binormal Vector

  1. Oct 31, 2011 #1
    Hi! :)

    The question is for r (t) =<t, 4-t2, 0>, find N(t),T(t), and B(t).

    First I took the derivative of r (t), and divided it by its length to calculate T(t), which is <1/sqrt(1+4t2),-2t/sqrt(1+4t2,0)>. Then I took the derivative of this using the product rule, and divided it by its length to calculate N(t), which is <-2t/sqrt(1+4t2),-1/sqrt(1+4t2),0)>.

    Taking the cross product of these two gives the binormalvector, which is <0,0,0>.

    Is this done correctly, or does anyone get a different answer?


    Thanks in advance! I didn't do all of the work on here, but I hope that's okay, as I have already done the work to find the answer...?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 31, 2011 #2

    SammyS

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    Show the steps for finding N(t). You have an error in this.

    The cross-product is not zero. Did you take the scalar product?
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2011
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