Finding the Induced Magnetic Field: Right-Hand Rule

In summary, the conversation discusses how to use the right-hand rule to find the induced magnetic field. The rule involves pointing your thumb in the direction of either the current or the magnetic field, and curling your fingers in the direction of the other. There are different applications depending on the setup, such as using your thumb to point in the direction of the current for a straight wire, or curling your fingers for a loop of wire. The conversation also mentions the added complexity of applying Lenz's Law and notes that explaining the right-hand rule in general can be tedious without a specific problem to work with.
  • #1
waywardtigerlily
10
0
Hello.
I am studying for my final and I can't remember how to find the induced magnetic field. I need it because, in my right hand rules handout that i must know, it says put your thumb in the direction of the induced magnetic field and you will curl your fingers into the direction of the induced current.
Thanks!
 
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  • #2
Its backwards, your thumb points the direction of the current, and yor fingers curl in the direction of the magnetic field.
 
  • #3
No no no!

You point your thumb along the "thingy" that is in a straight line. This could be either the current, or the magnetic field! I will demonstrate two examples.

1. You have a straight wire with a current in one direction. Here, you use your thumb to point in the direction of the current, and the curl of your fingers will tell you the circular direction of the current.

2. You have a loop of wire that has a current in one direction. Here, you curl your fingers in the direction of the current, and the direction that your thumb is pointing is the direction of the magnetic field.

Induced magnetic field has an added complexity because you have to apply Lenz's Law to the situation. Unless you have a specific problem you're working with, it's tedious to explain how to use the right-hand rule in general.

Zz.
 

Related to Finding the Induced Magnetic Field: Right-Hand Rule

1. What is the right-hand rule and how is it used to find the induced magnetic field?

The right-hand rule is a method used to determine the direction of the induced magnetic field in relation to the direction of the current and the magnetic field. To use the right-hand rule, point your thumb in the direction of the current, your fingers in the direction of the magnetic field, and the palm of your hand will indicate the direction of the induced magnetic field.

2. What is the difference between an induced magnetic field and a permanent magnetic field?

An induced magnetic field is a temporary magnetic field that is created when a current passes through a conductor. It is only present when the current is flowing. A permanent magnetic field, on the other hand, is a magnetic field that is always present, such as the Earth's magnetic field or the magnetic field of a magnet.

3. How does the strength of the induced magnetic field depend on the current and the magnetic field?

The strength of the induced magnetic field is directly proportional to the strength of the current and the strength of the magnetic field. This means that as the current or the magnetic field increases, the induced magnetic field will also increase.

4. Can the direction of the induced magnetic field be reversed?

Yes, the direction of the induced magnetic field can be reversed by reversing the direction of either the current or the magnetic field. This is because the direction of the induced magnetic field is dependent on the direction of the current and the magnetic field.

5. How can the right-hand rule be applied to determine the direction of the magnetic force on a moving charged particle?

The right-hand rule can be used to determine the direction of the magnetic force on a moving charged particle by pointing your thumb in the direction of the particle's velocity, your fingers in the direction of the magnetic field, and the palm of your hand will indicate the direction of the magnetic force. This is known as the Fleming's left-hand rule.

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