Finding the Original Frequency of a Vibrating Tuning Fork

In summary, the problem presented involves finding the original frequency of a tuning fork, based on the lengths of two air columns that produce resonance. The first length is 0.25 m and the second length is 0.80 m, with a speed of sound of 343 m/s. By using the difference between the two lengths and taking into account the "effective length" effect, the half-wavelength can be determined and used to find the original frequency. Further explanation and resources can be found in the provided links.
  • #1
Haftred
55
0
A vibrating tuning fork is held above a column of air [...] The shortest length of an air column that produces resonance is L(1) - 0.25 m. The next length that produces resonsnace is L(2) - 0.80 m. 343 m/s is what I will use for sound. How can I find the original frequency of the tuning fork?

The original problem can be found here: (Number 3)

http://www.collegeboard.com/prod_downloads/ap/students/physics/ap04_frq_physics_b_b.pdf
 
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  • #2
Your minus signs are supposed to be equal signs. An explanation with some pictures worth a thousand words can be found here.

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/waves/clocol.html#c1

If you click on the "Resonance tube experiment" you can even put in your numbers to explore the solution for the ideal case. The problem as stated seems to be throwing you a curve. If the first length of air is 0.25m, the second length of air should ideally be three times that, or 0.75m. Apparently they are expecting you to assume there is deviation from ideal behavior because of the diameter of the tube, and use the difference between 0.80m and 0.25 m to come up with the half-wavelength. There is in fact such an "effective length" effect, briefly described in this description of the experiment.

http://world.casio.com/edu/resources/program_lib/ea200/pdf/07_p26_27.pdf
 
  • #3


To find the original frequency of the tuning fork, we can use the formula v = fλ, where v is the speed of sound (343 m/s), f is the frequency, and λ is the wavelength. We know that the shortest length of the column of air that produces resonance is L(1) - 0.25 m, so we can use this length to find the corresponding wavelength.

λ = 4(L(1) - 0.25) = 4(0.25) = 1 m

Now, we can plug in the values for v and λ into the formula to solve for the original frequency:

343 m/s = f(1 m)

f = 343 Hz

Therefore, the original frequency of the tuning fork is 343 Hz. This frequency is the same for both L(1) and L(2) because the wavelength is the same for both lengths. This means that the tuning fork is producing a standing wave with a node at the open end of the column of air.
 

Related to Finding the Original Frequency of a Vibrating Tuning Fork

1. How do you determine the original frequency of a vibrating tuning fork?

The original frequency of a vibrating tuning fork can be determined by using a frequency meter or a device that measures the number of vibrations per second. The frequency can also be calculated by dividing the speed of sound in air (approximately 343 m/s) by the wavelength of the sound wave produced by the tuning fork.

2. Why is it important to find the original frequency of a vibrating tuning fork?

Knowing the original frequency of a tuning fork is important because it is a standard reference for musicians and scientists to tune other instruments and perform experiments related to sound and vibrations. It is also used in industries such as music production and medical imaging.

3. What factors can affect the original frequency of a vibrating tuning fork?

The material and shape of the tuning fork, temperature, and external forces such as pressure and tension can affect the original frequency of a vibrating tuning fork. The frequency can also change over time due to wear and tear or changes in the environment.

4. How can you ensure accuracy when finding the original frequency of a vibrating tuning fork?

To ensure accuracy, it is important to use calibrated equipment and perform multiple measurements to calculate an average frequency. It is also essential to eliminate any external factors that may affect the frequency, such as background noise or vibrations.

5. Can the original frequency of a vibrating tuning fork be altered or adjusted?

The original frequency of a vibrating tuning fork can be altered or adjusted by changing its physical properties, such as length or material. However, the original frequency is a characteristic of the tuning fork and cannot be altered without modifying the device itself.

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