Finding the Value of B in a Simple Equation

  • Thread starter abot
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In summary, the equation is asking to find the value of A when given the value of B, using the Pythagorean Theorem. An example of solving the equation is provided, with the restrictions that A and B must be positive and A must be less than B. The equation can also be solved algebraically, but using the Pythagorean Theorem is a simpler method.
  • #1
abot
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HI, i can't solve this equation. I am solving for B the answer in the book does not match mine. PLZ help.


(1.5999A)^2= B^2 + A^2

the answer in the book is 1.247
 
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  • #2
What is A? You need two equations to solve for two variables.
 
  • #3
thats all i have. the parent equation was

.0251A=.0157sqrtB^2 + A^2
 
  • #4
Are you absolutely sure the answer in the book isn't "1.247A"? :wink:

Anyway, just subtract A^2 from both sides and take a square root to get that answer.
 

Related to Finding the Value of B in a Simple Equation

1. What is the equation asking to solve?

The equation is asking to find the value of A when given the value of B, in order for both sides to be equal.

2. How do you solve this equation?

This equation can be solved by using the Pythagorean Theorem, where (1.5999A)^2 represents the square of the hypotenuse and B^2 + A^2 represents the sum of the squares of the other two sides.

3. Can you provide an example of solving this equation?

For example, if B = 3, then the equation becomes (1.5999A)^2= 3^2 + A^2. By using the Pythagorean Theorem, we can expand this to (1.5999A)^2= 9 + A^2. Then, we can solve for A by taking the square root of both sides, giving us A = 2.86.

4. Are there any restrictions on the values of A and B in this equation?

Yes, A and B must both be positive numbers in order for the equation to make sense. Additionally, the value of A must be less than B in order for the equation to have a solution.

5. Can this equation be solved algebraically?

Yes, this equation can be solved algebraically by expanding the squares on both sides, simplifying the equation, and then solving for A. However, using the Pythagorean Theorem is a quicker and more straightforward approach.

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