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Fire alarms

  1. Feb 9, 2009 #1

    wolram

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    The little round battery operated one's, has any one found one that doe's not sound off
    at the slightest whiff from the cooker, i mean i have one in my living room that is yards away from the cooker and that sounds off with no visible smoke about, even the one upstairs
    has gone off a few times.

    And it is not my cooking, the last thing i burnt was months ago.
     
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  3. Feb 9, 2009 #2

    mgb_phys

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    But then how would you know that tea is ready?

    You aren't supposed to put them in kitchens for this reason (which is a bit daft cos thats where all the fires start!). Time to clean the oven?
     
  4. Feb 9, 2009 #3

    wolram

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    My cooker is clean as a whistle, it should be i spend as much on oven cleaner as i do food.

    I think you got it right, it is more a food ready alarm rather than a fire alarm, and i do clean the alarm often, i would chuck the things out, but i bet a pound to a penny i would have a real fire the next day.
     
  5. Feb 9, 2009 #4

    Ouabache

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    We resolved this scenerio, by installing the smoke detector in the room next to kitchen. If cooking odours were strong enough to set it off, we closed the door between the kitchen & adjacent room.
     
  6. Feb 10, 2009 #5
    It could be due to the dust in your house?Are you a bit advanced in years and do you suffer from dust?My wife has to dust me off every time I go out.I quite enjoy it when she uses a feather duster
     
  7. Feb 10, 2009 #6
    I had to remove my smoke alarm and install a heat alarm. I still have a smoke alarm in my sleeping area and laundry room. The heat alarm, goes off only when a certain temp is reached, its also tied in with my home alarm system, which automatically calls the fire department.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heat_detector
     
  8. Feb 10, 2009 #7
    That sounds dangerous hypatia.I would have thought that any fire would be well underway before a heat alarm is triggered.
     
  9. Feb 10, 2009 #8

    mgb_phys

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    I thought the smoke alarms were tuned to a particular particle size, so they are supposed to trigger from a smoldering foam sofa before you can see any smoke.

    I remember we had to have different ones fitted in offices where presumably paper is a big risk than in a workshop where it was burning electricals.
     
  10. Feb 10, 2009 #9

    Borek

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    About 15 years ago a friend of mine was making his living by repairing some strange electronic devices. Once he was given a bunch of gas detectors to clean, repair, adjust - whatever. It seemed to him they were all sensitive to nothing. Then he decided to use them at lowest sensitivity setting and walk his house. He found a gas leak.
     
  11. Feb 10, 2009 #10
    Because alpha particles are so easily absorbed I do not think that particle size would be very relevant -I may be wrong.Most,if not all of the alarms sold in the UK use americium 241 as the source this having a long half life.
     
  12. Feb 10, 2009 #11

    mgb_phys

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    That was the point, one of them had to be an optical smoke detector and the other could be a regular Americium one. I can't remember which way round it was though!
     
  13. Feb 10, 2009 #12
    Yes I suppose an optical one could cover a larger area or something similar.
     
  14. Feb 10, 2009 #13

    Borek

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    Don't tell me Brits are not able to make their own detectors.
     
  15. Feb 10, 2009 #14

    mgb_phys

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    Because all the British isotopes are perfectly stable, they don't go firing off particles at the slightest provocation.
     
  16. Feb 10, 2009 #15

    russ_watters

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    ...which makes them useless in a dealing with a crisis situation?
     
  17. Feb 10, 2009 #16
    Brits are nice sensitive gentle people and manage crisis situations with tender loving persuasion.
     
  18. Feb 10, 2009 #17

    tiny-tim

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    crisis? what crisis?

    in case of fire, shout 'fire"!

    and what's all the fuss? :confused:goldfish don't have fire alarms anyway :smile: … ​
     
  19. Feb 10, 2009 #18

    mgb_phys

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    Shout? I don't think so.
    I think a British smoke alarm would just cough - discreetly.​
     
  20. Feb 11, 2009 #19

    tiny-tim

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    in case of fire shout "fire"

    ah … that's exactly why we English (I don't know about the Scots and the Welsh, and I'm pretty sure it doesn't apply to the Northern Irish!) have to be told to shout …

    English hotels and barracks and so on always have notices saying "in case of fire shout fire", otherwise it would never occur to us! :smile:
     
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