First derivative

  • Thread starter Jason03
  • Start date
  • #1
161
0
Im trying to find the first derivative of the following equation:

[tex]
\frac{2}{e^x+e^{-x}}
[/tex]

Im trying to figure how to approach this....

i know the derivative of ex is ex....but should I move the denominator to the numerator first?
 
Last edited:

Answers and Replies

  • #2
135
0
You need to use the chain rule.
 
  • #3
161
0
not to be a pest...but im a little rusty on the chain rule....how would that apply?
 
  • #4
berkeman
Mentor
60,562
10,877
There are formulas for the derivitave of a product and of a quotient. Are you familiar with them? If you're not familiar with the derivative of a quotient, you can express the quotient as a product:

[tex]\frac{A}{B} = A * B^{-1}[/tex]

And use your usual equation for the derivative of a product.
 
  • #5
Ouabache
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
1,340
8
Both forms of chain rule work fine.. (product or quotient).. here's a refresher
 
Last edited:
  • #6
berkeman
Mentor
60,562
10,877
Cool website, Ouabache!
 
  • #7
161
0
for the following problem

[tex]

\int {x(5x)^{-x^2}dx}

[/tex]

wouldnt this simplify to

[tex]

\int{5x^{-1}dx}

[/tex]
 
  • #8
135
0
I don't think those two integrals are equivalent.
 
  • #9
161
0
actually I wrote the first expression wrong ....this is what the first expression should be...

[tex]

\int {x}{(5^{-x^2})dx}

[/tex]
 
  • #10
Dick
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
26,263
619
Change the 5^(-x^2) to a power of e instead. Then use a u substitution.
 

Related Threads on First derivative

  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
10
Views
11K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
10
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
6
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
4K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
946
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
26K
Top