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News Flint Water Crisis 2013 to 2016

  1. Jan 20, 2016 #1

    Astronuc

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    How the people of Flint, Mich., ended up with contaminated drinking water
    http://news.yahoo.com/how-the-peopl...th-contaminated-drinking-water-043602916.html

    As far as I can tell, it was a local/municipal decision, so why it's a problem, or crisis, for the governor, is not clear to me. Maybe I'm wrong, but the state government/administration did not force the Flint government to make a really bad and stupid choice of supplying contaminated water to its citizens.

    So what's the story here?

    The mayor Dayne Walling did have the audacity to run for re-election.
    - despite the lead and whatever chemicals are in it.

    Apparently there was some disagreement between Flint and DWSD?
    http://www.mlive.com/news/flint/index.ssf/2013/04/state_gives_flint_ok_t.html

    The article doesn't explain why Flint felt the need to go elsewhere for water.

    I worked in a water department, and before a source of water was considered, it was thoroughly tested, and we tested multiple times a day for quality, and probably monthly for detailed chemical analysis at random sites on the system.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2016
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  3. Jan 20, 2016 #2

    russ_watters

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    My understanding is that due to budget problems, the city government was taken over by the state and a group of state appointed trustees made the key decisions. Still, at ground level, it doesn't explain why the water was not treated.
     
  4. Jan 20, 2016 #3

    Astronuc

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    Ah, hence the state-appointed emergency manager.

    Still, what were these people thinking? Or perhaps they weren't.
     
  5. Jan 21, 2016 #4

    Student100

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    Does Michigan require yearly water quality reports? Shouldn't something like high levels of lead been discovered then even if they weren't during the initial site selection? I guess this link explains it somewhat, the supply was very corrosive and was leeching lead from service lines (assuming that wouldn't show up in water quality reports):

    http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/11/health/toxic-tap-water-flint-michigan/

    City now faces multiple lawsuits, and the DEQ resigned.
     
  6. Jan 21, 2016 #5

    russ_watters

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    As an engineer, this baffles me. The job of "water supplier" only has two components:
    1. Provide enough.
    2. Make sure it is safe to drink.

    If the report that preventing this would only have required $100 a day of treatment is correct, somebody or everybody must have simply ignored task #2.

    To answer your questions more directly thouh, no it is not difficult to pre-identify these problems.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2016
  7. Jan 21, 2016 #6

    Vanadium 50

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  8. Jan 21, 2016 #7

    Astronuc

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  9. Jan 22, 2016 #8

    mheslep

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    Yes, as common sense would dictate. Schools, water, the sheriff, garbage. That's what local municipalities do.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2016
  10. Jan 23, 2016 #9

    Astronuc

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  11. Jan 24, 2016 #10

    Vanadium 50

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  12. Mar 29, 2016 #11

    Astronuc

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    Flint official: State overruled plan for corrosion control
    http://news.yahoo.com/flint-official-state-ordered-no-corrosion-control-213723634.html [Broken]

    I wonder how many times this has happened - again and again?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  13. Mar 29, 2016 #12

    russ_watters

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    That's like crash testing your own car...
     
  14. Mar 30, 2016 #13

    mheslep

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    Depends on what "testing" means in this context. Testing the river water, directly from the river for a year before connection to the public, good idea, or testing the water as it flows through the pipes, not so good?
     
  15. Mar 30, 2016 #14

    mheslep

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    Seems to me the Flint Emergency Manager must bare the responsibility for the water problem, if the title "Manager" means, as it seems, the chief executive responsible for Flint at the time. If one doesn't like the emergency manager appointments, then responsibility lies with the prior elected executives of Flint who ruined the finances of the city. The state government of Michigan, no state government, can not oversee the hundreds of water districts any more than a state can oversee every local garbage pickup, school district, or county cop. States and the Federal Government can make rules but they don't scale to detailed management.

    Shifting the responsibility away from Flint is a sure way to have more Flints.
     
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