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Flotsam and net some

  1. Aug 17, 2004 #1
    What about using these twenty mile long fish nets for scooping up the burgeoning trash in the oceans, instead of depleting sea life?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 17, 2004 #2
    you can't eat trash
     
  4. Aug 17, 2004 #3
    Some environmentalist groups think we should.
     
  5. Aug 17, 2004 #4
    phatmonky
    Yes, but trash may eventually consume you.
     
  6. Aug 17, 2004 #5

    ohhhh, I see what you did right there!

    Your original post said INSTEAD of depleting sea life. News to you, we are going to keep eating sea life. So the depletion will continue.

    Perhaps an alternative garbage collections system. I don't see how your theoretical nets will suddenly stop grabbing animals and start focusing on trash.
     
  7. Aug 17, 2004 #6

    jimmy p

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    There will always be fish caught, but (it's a LOOOOOOOOOONG shot) you could study fish populations in areas of the sea and when they are lowest in an area, start trawlin' for trash.
     
  8. Aug 17, 2004 #7

    russ_watters

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    This post makes me wonder if you've ever seen the ocean.
     
  9. Aug 17, 2004 #8

    amp

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    A lot of trash lies along the coastlines fouling up beaches and oceanliners dump their refuse into the ocean, as large as the oceans are you hardly see it but the fact that its seen means the trash is accumulating.
     
  10. Aug 18, 2004 #9
    phatmonky
    russ_watters
    Fact One: such nets have managed to deplete the oceans of over half of many fish species, so why not put them to use collecting flotsam, avoiding most sea life (by the radar currently used to locate them for consumption) as jimmy p suggests.

    Fact Two: The Pacific Ocean contains a "sargasso sea" with many thousands of square miles coalescing more and more of the manufacturing end products from South East Asia.
     
  11. Aug 18, 2004 #10

    russ_watters

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    The first part may be a fact but that doesn't make the second part realistic. A fishing boat trawling for trash would net about a soda can a day. Again, it appears to me you've never seen the ocean.
    No, actually, the sargasso sea is in the Atlantic ocean, and again, even in there, you'd net about a coke can a day. On my one translantic deployment, though, we did find an abandoned lifeboat in the middle of the Sargasso Sea. I have some good pics of us shooting it to bits...

    Also, it would seem you guys are unaware of the regulations on ocean dumping. You can't just dump indiscriminately. You can't ever dump plastic, for example. See the graphic in the middle of the page: http://www.boat-ed.com/or/course/p4-13_wastedischarge.htm
     
  12. Aug 19, 2004 #11
    russ,

    In the past year I heard on the news that megatons of solid waste - in large part plastic - from South East Asia have been dumped into the Pacific Ocean. I believe there are areas of the ocean where it will become critical to skim for this trash.

    My reference to a "sargasso sea" was just that - not the actual Sargasso Sea, but an analogy to it in the Pacific. Call the region "the doldrums" if you like. This is an area which concentrates flotsam but has, I believe, a dearth of fish and is optimum for netting these debris. (Plant life might interfere with such an operation, though it might be harvested as renewable biomass for fuel.)

    Do you think that the Chinese, or any other nearby developing countries are concerned as we about American dumping regulations, which extend a relatively small distance into the Pacific?

    You throw out the hypothetical "soda can" catch as a red herring, or at best a gross miscalculation misrepresenting these and previous facts I have stated. I grew up around oceanography - my dad was editor of Sea Technology magazine and introduced me to his friends Andy Rechnitzer and Don Walsh, my brother works for NAVOCEANO and a cousin outfits ships for Bob Ballard.

    I don't wish to insult you, but your responses to my topic seem to me preconceived, disinterested and sarcastic.
     
  13. Aug 19, 2004 #12

    amp

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    I have to agree with LBooda I watched a program 'Nature' or 'The Blue Planet' and it showed some of the difficulty ocean life is having with 'Trash'. One memorable scene was of a sea turtle trying to eat a plastic container, the narrator remarked on how it may resemble a jellyfish to the turtle.
     
  14. Aug 19, 2004 #13
    I don't think anyone is saying that we should curb pollution. The question is "can nets do anything?"
     
  15. Aug 19, 2004 #14

    amp

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    Yes, nets probably could scoop up a lot on refuse that floats and if care is taken with little adverse effects on sea-life.
     
  16. Aug 19, 2004 #15
    So I've been told, but can anyone show me anything explaining the plan in detail? How much will it cost? How much trash will it pickup? What is the benefit over other proposed fixes? Who will do this?

    Pardon me if I seem skeptical, I simply am reading generalized statements that sound good, but with no backing or detail
     
  17. Aug 19, 2004 #16

    amp

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    Phat, I don't think the legislation has been drawn up yet. :rofl: :tongue2:
     
  18. Aug 19, 2004 #17

    Well, if that's all there is to this argument, I think we should just train dolphins to clean it up for us! They obviously can find hte trash easier since they keep trying to eat it :smile:
     
  19. Aug 19, 2004 #18

    amp

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    Dolphins :rofl: Turtles :eek: same animal. :biggrin: Nope. Dolphins are brighter and eat fish.
     
  20. Aug 19, 2004 #19
    I wasn't making my statement based on anything in this thread. I simply realized that dolphins would be the easiest to train to find our trash. Then we can go scoop it up!

    This is already better than the net idea.
     
  21. Aug 19, 2004 #20
    If we wait long enough, the problem will need addressing by some means. Nets are proven technology for sieving objects from the sea.

    http://www.seashepherd.org/essays/ocean_realm_aut01.html

    http://www.amcs.org.au/learn/fact_sheets/facts_marine_debris.html

    http://www.buei.bm/pages/oceannotions.html

    www.naturalist.com/eco-news/ index.cfm?p=display&id=7452 - 32k

    A rough calculation yields 1,000,000 metric tons accumulated since plastics have been produced, compared to 100,000,000 metric tons of fish caught annually, with an estimated average age of one year. A factor of ten may be introduced to the amount of plastics if one considers their lifetime - 500 years. Eventually we could net one pound of plastic to every ten pounds of fish - much more in the natural catch basin of the doldrums.
     
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