Flu Vaccine

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  • Thread starter Evo
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  • #1
Evo
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My company is giving free flu vaccinations at my office the end of October, but I think I will opt to use my free voucher to get it sooner at the doctor.

I've gotten the free flu vaccines for the last couple of years and I am so glad I did.

I'm trying to convince Evo Child to get a vaccination, but she's fallen victim to internet misinformation. I don't want her getting the flu. A few years ago she had pnuemonia that lingered and she developed pleurisy. She was very ill for over 6 months. She needs the vaccine and idiot misinformation on the web has her scared. :mad:

Can we get some professional input here? Thanks.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
berkeman
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As an EMT, I got beat up by the Paramedics and Nurses and Docs that I work with, for not bothering to get a flu shot in previous years. Now I get one each year, especially with all of the patient contacts. Kinda' like a teacher -- lots of carriers that you deal with.

She may get a little sick from the vaccine, but it will only last a day or so, and will not be the full-blown flu (EDIT -- AFAIK, even this is rare). Everybody needs to get both the regular seasonal flu shot and the H1N1 vaccine this year. We need to keep this coming flu season under control as much as we can, and it's going to take everybody's help.
 
  • #3
vanesch
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Here in France, there's a strange tendency. I used to get a seasonal flu shot about every year (except for those years when I was too late, like when there was that crazy avian flu panic, and everybody got a seasonal flu shot - the stocks were sold out in a few days time). The H1N1 vaccine will probably be available mid - october or so (although the epidemic is already coming up quickly, so it might come too late...). Now, there are a lot of rumors about that vaccine, and about 50% of MD don't want to get it themselves according to a recent poll on the radio ! My own MD isn't keen either :bugeye:
So what's up here ?

Is there actually *any* greater risk for this H1N1 vaccine than for the regular vaccine (except maybe that it might turn out to be less effective, but still more than 0% when you don't get it) ?
 
  • #4
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Cold and Flu Guidelines from the American Lung Association gives great advice.:smile:
http://www.lungusa.org/site/pp.asp?c=dvLUK9O0E&b=35868#what [Broken]
 
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  • #6
berkeman
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And the CDC website resouce for H1N1 info. Click on "Q&A" for info about the vaccine...

http://www.cdc.gov/H1N1FLU/

.

One caveat from the CDC Q&A website that I linked above:

CDC said:
Can seasonal vaccine and novel H1N1 vaccine be administered at the same time?

Inactivated 2009 H1N1 vaccine can be administered at the same visit as any other vaccine, including pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. Live 2009 H1N1 vaccine can be administered at the same visit as any other live or inactivated vaccine EXCEPT seasonal live attenuated influenza vaccine
 
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  • #7
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Excellent Berkeman! :biggrin: Thank you.

From the link (url) that I previously provided we should make mention to all viewers how important it is to read *everything* on the websites that we have presented. Here is something important from the link I earlier provided:

Who Should Get a Flu Shot?

All persons aged 6 months or older, including school children, who want to reduce the risk of becoming ill with influenza or of transmitting influenza to others and are not allergic to eggs.

Adults 50 years or older.

All children aged 6 months through 18 years.

Adults and children with chronic medical conditions, especially asthma, other lung diseases, diabetes and heart disease.

Adults and children with a suppressed immune system.

All women who will be pregnant during the influenza season.

Residents of nursing homes and other chronic care facilities.

Health-care workers involved in direct patient care.

Out-of-home caregivers and household contacts of children less than 6 months old.

Who Should NOT Get a Flu Shot?

You should NOT get the flu shot this year if

•you are allergic to eggs or any component of the vaccine. The viral material in flu vaccines is grown in eggs.
•you are younger than 6 months.
•you have a history of Guillain-Barre Syndrome.
•you have an acute illness and a fever. You should not get a flu shot until you are feeling better.

:smile:
 
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  • #8
berkeman
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Thanks for that VoMars! I hadn't heard the contraindication for folks allergic to eggs yet. Is that coming out of the H1N1 trials? Or has that been around for a while for flu vacinations?
 
  • #9
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It's old news babe! :biggrin:

Thanks again,

Mars

p.s. Noticed you have a HAM radio. CB's are fun while on the road.
 
  • #10
Pengwuino
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I hadn't heard the contraindication for folks allergic to eggs yet. Is that coming out of the H1N1 trials? Or has that been around for a while for flu vacinations?

I always thought that was a standard thing with at least the flu vaccine being created using eggs....
 
  • #11
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Is that coming out of the H1N1 trials?

Sorry, I was in a rush. Let me explain further to avoid confusion. I gave information about "flu" vaccine requested by Evo.

Let's now discuss H1N1 Flu from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The latest update as of September 22, 2009. Here is the beginning of the article, but be sure to read the entire article.

Updated Interim Recommendations for the Use of Antiviral Medications in the Treatment and Prevention of Influenza for the 2009-2010 Season
September 22, 2009 2:00 PM ET

These recommendations have been updated to provide additional guidance for clinicians in prescribing antiviral medications for treatment and prevention of influenza during the 2009-2010 season. In general, the priority use of antiviral medications during this season continues to be in people who are hospitalized with influenza and those at increased risk of influenza-related complications as outlined in the recommendations first posted on May 6, 2009 and updated on September 8, 2009. This document has been updated to:


1. Provide additional context and guidance for clinicians regarding the risk for complications and treatment considerations for young and very young children.

2. Provide more information about the possible underlying physiological conditions that may be associated with neuromuscular and neurocognitive disorders that might contribute to the increased risk of influenza-related complications in persons with these disorders.

3. Provide information regarding the oral dosing dispenser included in the Tamiflu® oral suspension packaging to insure that units of measure on the dosing device and the prescription instructions match.
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/recommendations.htm

Here is the difference between Influenza Vaccines and Antiviral Drugs. :smile:

What are Influenza Vaccines Made of?

Vaccines are designed to boost the body’s immune system. Influenza vaccine is made up of parts of an inactive influenza virus (dead) or a version of the virus which doesn’t have the ability to cause an infection (inert). Once the vaccine enters the blood stream; the normal immune reaction kicks in. The body creates antibodies which attempt to rid the body of the injected virus. This serves to sensitize the body’s immune system. When the body is later confronted with the “real” virus, it is prepared and will effectively fight off the virus.

The Influenza Virus is Grown in Chicken Eggs

A weakened or inactive portion of the influenza virus is injected into the amniotic fluid of a fertilized chicken egg. In the egg and embryo the inactive virus finds a suitable atmosphere where it can multiply. Once it has finished growing, the fluid is removed and purified. This procedure is very limiting especially in cases where there may be a shortage of eggs. The reality of avian virus is real and technically avian flu or bird flu could diminish egg supplies which would lead to a shortage of influenza vaccines. Scientists are working on developing new methods that bypass the use of chicken eggs.

What are Antiviral Drugs Made of?

Antiviral drugs do not contain the active virus. They are designed to destroy the virus. Antiviral drugs are most effective when administered early in the infection. As the infection period lengthens, the virus is incorporated in the host’s cells. This makes it harder to stop. If the viruses are sopped before they enter the cells this can prevent the flu (illness) from occurring or can slow down the illness until the body is able to develop an immune response. Antiviral target viruses before they infest the body’s tissues; once in the cell antiviral drugs are ineffective against.

How Antiviral Drugs are Made?

Antiviral drugs are mostly chemical in nature and can be synthesized in a large scale. They are designed to inhibit viruses from replicating. There are a number of different antiviral drugs available. Their efficacy sometimes is questionable as viruses have a knack of mutating as they adapt to the antiviral drugs. Tamiflu and Relenza are two of the commonly used antiviral drugs to treat an influenza virus infection.
http://pharmacology.suite101.com/article.cfm/flu_vaccine_and_antiviral_drugs#ixzz0SC8BJs6w
 
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  • #12
Moonbear
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If Evo child is susceptible to pleurisy and pneumonia as complications of flu, then yes, she really better get the vaccinations. Otherwise, I don't honestly think that the vaccine risks substantially outweigh the likelihood of actually catching the flu to consider it mandatory unless you work in a hospital or doctor's office, where there's a high likelihood of being exposed to the nastiest flu.

I ignore the seasonal flu vaccine every year. It's too much of a crap shoot whether it's going to protect against anything or not, and I'm not in any high risk category. If I catch flu, I catch flu...a few days off work so I can sit in bed and sniffle actually sounds like a good idea right now.
 
  • #13
Evo
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If Evo child is susceptible to pleurisy and pneumonia as complications of flu, then yes, she really better get the vaccinations. Otherwise, I don't honestly think that the vaccine risks substantially outweigh the likelihood of actually catching the flu to consider it mandatory unless you work in a hospital or doctor's office, where there's a high likelihood of being exposed to the nastiest flu.

I ignore the seasonal flu vaccine every year. It's too much of a crap shoot whether it's going to protect against anything or not, and I'm not in any high risk category. If I catch flu, I catch flu...a few days off work so I can sit in bed and sniffle actually sounds like a good idea right now.
She is susceptible and I would prefer she gets the vaccine, so I agree with you. She really needs the vaccine.

I have been terribly ill for weeks with complications from the flu, so getting the vaccines and not being sick since is like a miracle. My employer brings people to our office to give the vaccines, so almost everyone gets them. It's amazing, no one gets sick anymore. I highly recommend them to anyone that can take them. I know from members that have had the flu how sick they get and how long they are sick, it's not a cold, where you have sniffles for a few days. The flu can kill you, and if it doesn't, you think it's going to kill you.
 
  • #14
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Imagine all those millions of people who do not want to vaccinate themselves now, panicking when the virus mutates and becomes more dangerous. If the original vaccine still protects well against the mutated virus (perhaps it won't protect you from becoming ill anymore, but it may make the illness more mild), you may have missed the boat.

A new vaccine campaign will of course be started, but it will take time to vaccinate a significant part of the country and it takes time to build up immunity from the moment that you get the shot.
 
  • #15
lisab
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Imagine all those millions of people who do not want to vaccinate themselves now, panicking when the virus mutates and becomes more dangerous. If the original vaccine still protects well against the mutated virus (perhaps it won't protect you from becoming ill anymore, but it may make the illness more mild), you may have missed the boat.

A new vaccine campaign will of course be started, but it will take time to vaccinate a significant part of the country and it takes time to build up immunity from the moment that you get the shot.

But even if it mutates, won't the old vaccine still provide some protection?

And that leads me to something I've been wondering. I just recovered from what I am pretty sure was swine flu (I never got sick enough to go to the doctor to get a definite diagnosis). So if it mutates and becomes more lethal, would I have a bit of protection against it, since I had the mild version?

Btw, I still plan to get the swine flu vaccine, if there is enough to go around. I also will get the seasonal flu shot, even though I've never had the flu.
 
  • #16
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It depends on how much the virus changes. It is possible it can mutate enough to render the vaccine useless, but according to WHO, it is unlikely the virus will mutate enough for this to happen. It is also possible that it will change, but not enough to render the vaccine useless. According to the WHO. the virus seams to be very stable, and it is unlikely it will mutate.
 
  • #17
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Is the the Swine flu really as bad as the media making sound like? I mean still wasting for the bird flu pandemic that's suppose to kill us all. From what I heard Swine flu is not as bad as the regular flu just it mutates faster making it harder to come with vaccines for it.
From ViewsofMars post said:
•you are younger than 6 months.
I'm impressed by the fact that infants are now using the internet.
 
  • #18
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Statistically, the vast majority of people who die from the H1N1 virus had compromised immune systems and/or respiratory problems. The fact that she has a previous history of respiratory issues combined with the fact that H1N1 is particularly contagious; She needs to get the vaccine. While I'm not a fan of scare-tactics, perhaps you should tell her that her likelihood of dieing from H1N1 is much greater than that of an average person. The risk of harmful side-affects from the vaccine is very minimal, especially since the alternative is so dangerous for her.
 
  • #19
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i don't think H1N1 is offered to anyone here except old/young/pregnant/etc. i'm just going to try keeping my vit. D status high and hope for the best.
 
  • #20
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[msg.4]Cold and Flu Guidelines from the American Lung Association gives great advice.:smile:
http://www.lungusa.org/site/pp.asp?c=dvLUK9O0E&b=35868#what [Broken]

[msg.7] [snip]

From the link (url) that I previously provided we should make mention to all viewers how important it is to read *everything* on the websites that we have presented. Here is something important from the link I earlier provided:



:smile:

Who Should Get a Flu Shot?

All persons aged 6 months or older, including school children, who want to reduce the risk of becoming ill with influenza or of transmitting influenza to others and are not allergic to eggs.

Adults 50 years or older.

All children aged 6 months through 18 years.

Adults and children with chronic medical conditions, especially asthma, other lung diseases, diabetes and heart disease.

Adults and children with a suppressed immune system.

All women who will be pregnant during the influenza season.

Residents of nursing homes and other chronic care facilities.

Health-care workers involved in direct patient care.

Out-of-home caregivers and household contacts of children less than 6 months old.

Who Should NOT Get a Flu Shot?

You should NOT get the flu shot this year if …

•you are allergic to eggs or any component of the vaccine. The viral material in flu vaccines is grown in eggs.
•you are younger than 6 months.
•you have a history of Guillain-Barre Syndrome.
•you have an acute illness and a fever. You should not get a flu shot until you are feeling better.
[msg. 17]
ViewsofMars
•you are younger than 6 months.
I'm impressed by the fact that infants are now using the internet.


Scott1, don't be silly. Perhaps you need to reread my messages since you obviously didn't in the first place.
 
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  • #21
berkeman
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Scott1, don't be silly. Perhaps you need to reread my messages since you obviously didn't in the first place.

No, he was obviously joking.
 
  • #22
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No, he was obviously joking.

Berkeman, I have to disagree with you. If you look at Scot1's message 17 then you will see he quote-mined from a larger article as noted in my earlier posting on this page 2 that was also presented on page 1. Scot1 has distorted the truth by doing so in message 17, and I'm most definately not impressed by his silly, curt remark which he *directed* at me. His reponse to me was this, "I'm impressed by the fact that infants are now using the internet." I don't appreciate it as a muture adult.

This is and should be a serious topic of discussion which was initiated by Evo.
 
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  • #23
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I'm a female over 50 years old that has never had the flu. :smile: I'm very healthy. The last time I had a cold was when I was in my teens.
 
  • #24
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Berkeman, I have to disagree with you. If you look at Scot1's message 17 then you will see he quote-mined from a larger article as noted in my earlier posting on this page 2 that was also presented on page 1. Scot1 has distorted the truth by doing so in message 17, and I'm most definately not impressed by his silly, curt remark which he *directed* at me. His reponse to me was this, "I'm impressed by the fact that infants are now using the internet." I don't appreciate it as a muture adult.

This is and should be a serious topic of discussion which was initiated by Evo.
I wasn't directing anything at you I just made a simple joke, don't take my joke too seriously.

Also no one has ever answered question
 
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  • #25
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scott1, a lot of it is simply fear of the unknown and "what-ifs", but swine flu is definitely something to be concerned about. swine flu is actually killing people, especially those with breathing problems and the obese from what i've read. probably at least as serious as regular flu.

bird flu otoh, infected very very few people, which means it didn't really cross the species barrier as was "feared". if there's anything positive that came over panic from bird flu, i think it would be the extra diligence in protecting the food supply (chickens).
 

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