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Fluid flow

  1. Oct 30, 2016 #1
    • Member warned that homework questions must be posted in a homework section
    Hi everyone,

    I have to answer some question about a physics lab..here are the questions
    A tank is empty by a pipe and we measure the height (y-y0) of fluid in the tank as a function of time. We obtain this graph ( I join the graph)
    We can find the relaxation time ile_TEX.gif with the relation : ile_TEX.cgi?(y-y_{0})%20=%20e^{\frac{-t}{\tau%20}}%20.gif
    with (yin -y0) is the initial height of the fluid in the tank and (y-y0) is the height of the fluid at a time t.
    I can easily isolate ile_TEX.gif but the teacher say that it's a part of the graph which is the best to evaluate ile_TEX.gif .
    He ask what is this part and why ??
    It's a physic lab about the fluid flow and poiseuil equation for viscosity...
    If someone can give me some track ..
    Sorry for my English I'm French.. TpFluidok.jpg
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 30, 2016 #2

    haruspex

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    Assume your time measurements are accurate, but there may be some small error up to Δy in each height measurement.
    If you pick two points (times) on the graph, how large might your error be in τ?
     
  4. Oct 30, 2016 #3
    The data in your graph does not satisfy your equation. If it did, the data would fall on a straight line.
     
  5. Oct 31, 2016 #4
    @haruspex if I have an error Δy on y I can eventually calculate the error on τ by the method of partial differentiation..

    @Chestermiller I know because we obtain this curve experimentally and there is certainly another factors that interfer. That's why the teacher as what's the best part of the curve to evaluate τ
     
  6. Oct 31, 2016 #5

    haruspex

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    That will depend on the cause of the error; which part of the curve does it least affect?
     
  7. Oct 31, 2016 #6
    That's what I'm looking for !!! Maybe the first part from t = 0s to t= 30s because we have a straight line like Chestermiller said ...
     
  8. Oct 31, 2016 #7
    There is also a straight line section between 80 and 110. Do you think inertial effects will be more important at short times or at long times?
     
  9. Nov 1, 2016 #8

    haruspex

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    Any chance there could be turbulence in some stage? I'm guessing not.
     
  10. Nov 1, 2016 #9
    Turbulence could definitely be a factor. At short times, when velocities are highest, the laminar-turbulent transition could be exceeded in the tube. Also, the hydrodynamic entrance length in the tube could be a significant factor at short times.
     
  11. Nov 2, 2016 #10
    I think at the begining of the experience the velocity of water through the pipe is greater and we don't have a laminar flow...so the best measure will occur at long times when (y-y0) is small .. what do you think about that ??
     
  12. Nov 2, 2016 #11

    haruspex

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    Up to a point. The difficulty at small y-y0 is the accuracy in measuring it. The pipe has some width. How exactly is y0 defined? I wonder if the graph would look straighter if you were to take y0 as being a bit less.
     
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