Flying Plane Direction Please help

In summary, the problem involves a plane flying at a bearing of 65 degrees and a speed of 56 km/h for 3 hours, and then changing its heading to a bearing of 90 degrees and continuing at the same speed for 1 hour. The question is asking for the bearing of the plane from its original position after the second vector is added. To solve this, one can use trigonometry to find the horizontal and vertical components of the two vectors, add them together, and use trigonometry again to find the angle from the beginning to the end.
  • #1
nettie2311
14
0

Homework Statement



A plane is flying at 56 km/h at a bearing of 65 degrees. After flying for 3 hours the plane heading is changed to a bearing of 90 degrees. After flying for a further 1 hour at 56 km/h what is the plane's bearing from its original position?



No clue how to answer this question...any help would be great..

Thanks,
 
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  • #2
Sketch the vectors. Use trigonometry to find their horizontal and vertical components. Add the horizontal components. Add the vertical ones.
Make a new vector with the totals. Sketch them. Use trigonometry to find the angle from beginning to end.
 
  • #3
Thanks for the reply, but physics is totally new to me and I've been online to try to teach myself but I'm having no luck...can you be more specific.
 
  • #4
56 km/h at a bearing of 65 degrees
Draw a cross and mark north, south, east, and west on the 4 directions.
From north, go 65 degrees toward east. Draw an arrow from the center of the cross at this angle. Mark its length 56 km/h x 3 hours = 168 km.
At the end of this vector, make a new cross and do the same thing for the second vector.
 
  • #5


I would approach this problem by breaking it down into smaller parts and using mathematical equations to solve it. First, I would draw a diagram to visualize the situation and label the given information. Then, I would use the given speed and time to calculate the distance traveled in each direction (using the formula distance = speed x time). Next, I would use trigonometry to find the distance and direction of the plane's position after 3 hours of flying at a bearing of 65 degrees. Finally, I would use the Pythagorean theorem and trigonometry to find the final bearing of the plane after flying for a further 1 hour at a bearing of 90 degrees. By following these steps, I would be able to determine the plane's bearing from its original position. Additionally, I would recommend practicing similar problems and reviewing basic trigonometry concepts to improve problem-solving skills in this area.
 

1. How do pilots determine the direction of a flying plane?

Pilots use a combination of instruments and visual cues to determine the direction of a flying plane. These instruments include a compass, GPS, and gyroscopic instruments that measure the plane's heading and orientation in relation to the Earth's magnetic field.

2. What is the importance of knowing the direction of a flying plane?

Knowing the direction of a flying plane is crucial for navigation and ensuring the plane stays on course. It also helps pilots avoid potential hazards and obstacles, such as other aircraft or severe weather.

3. Can a flying plane change direction mid-flight?

Yes, a flying plane can change direction mid-flight. Pilots can adjust the plane's heading by using the control surfaces, such as the rudder and ailerons, or by altering the engine thrust.

4. How is wind direction and speed taken into account when flying a plane?

Pilots use wind information from weather reports and onboard instruments to adjust their flight path and maintain the desired direction. They may also use techniques like crabbing or sideslipping to compensate for crosswinds.

5. What happens if a flying plane loses direction or navigation instruments malfunction?

If a flying plane loses direction or navigation instruments malfunction, pilots can rely on backup instruments, such as a magnetic compass, to determine the plane's heading. They may also use visual cues, such as landmarks or the sun's position, to help navigate. In some cases, air traffic control can also provide assistance to guide the plane to a safe landing.

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