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Food stash

  1. Dec 28, 2007 #1

    wolram

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    So what to make of this little lot? I have.

    Red, green, yellow peppers
    Sweet pointed peppers
    Birds eye chillies
    Finger chillies
    Scotch bonnet chillies
    Garlic
    Ginger and stem ginger
    Hot chilli powder
    Mixed chilli jalapenos
    Jasmin rice
    fish sauce
    Red onions
    Toasted sesame oil
    Infused chilli oil
    Sirloin steak
    Some veg
    plus loads of spices.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 28, 2007 #2

    Evo

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    Sounds like the great start to some szechuan cooking. :smile:
     
  4. Dec 28, 2007 #3

    wolram

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    I have watched some progs with Ken Hom or some such name, but that was years ago,
    may be you have some of Szechuans recipes?
     
  5. Dec 28, 2007 #4

    Evo

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    I will dig some up for you.
     
  6. Dec 28, 2007 #5
    The Szechuan kitchen would not exist without the essential ingredient Sichuan pepper :uhh:

    So even more shopping needed.
     
  7. Dec 28, 2007 #6

    wolram

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    I give up, no matter how many things i get there is all ways some thing else, well i went my own way, the flavour was heaven , but my innards did not like it, i feel like i have been shot in the guts with, some nasty thing.
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2007
  8. Dec 28, 2007 #7

    Evo

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    :grumpy: I was going to tell him about those.

    Strikes Andre down with a bolt of lightning

    Sorry, Andre, there are some things I just can't overlook. :wink:
     
  9. Dec 28, 2007 #8

    wolram

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    Ok, no matter how i hard i try, i am not a good cook, there is all ways some thing i do not have that can not be substituted for some other thing, it makes me so angry, i have a vast pantry, that is all ways lacking, grrrrr, i wish i knew a good cook.
     
  10. Dec 28, 2007 #9

    turbo

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    Woolie, it doesn't look like you're going to get much help from this crowd, so here goes. We don't use recipes for wok-meals, and you don't need to, either. It's like learning how to ride a bike - once you've done it a few times, you won't forget the basics, and you'll be eager to try new stuff.

    Steam some rice. Cut your steak into thin bite-sized strips. Process one or two of your hotter peppers with the cloves from one or two bulbs of garlic. Depending on your liking for garlic/chili peppers, you may want to process them very finely, or leave them a bit more chunky. Cut up all the vegetables that you might want to add to your dish, and keep them in separate bowls so you can add them at different times. Carrots take longer to cook than green pepper, celery and onions, and they take a little longer to cook than mushrooms, for instance.

    Put a little peanut oil in your wok and bring it up to heat until the oil just starts to smoke, and add the meat, and the mix of finely-chopped garlic and peppers. Some salt and black pepper would be good at this time, as well as some chili oil. Watch the heat. You don't want your oil to smoke too much, but you want to brown the meat and carmelize the juices from the garlic to get a rich nutty taste. Depending on how crunchy you want your carrots, you can add them at the same time the beef goes in (softer carrots), or you can give the beef a bit of a head-start (firmer carrots). Keep the mixture moving in the wok, and add the softer vegetables after a couple of minutes (mushrooms last). Pull out a bit of the mix during cooking (since you haven't done this before) and taste, to see what might be "missing" - your chance to be creative. You might think that the hotness needs to be punched up (Maybe cayenne or extra chili oil), or maybe you'd like the richness of freshly grated ginger root, or maybe the dish calls out for a nice hot/rich curry. It's all up to you. If you add wine or other watery liquid to the sauce, it might strip some of the dark seasoning layer off the wok. That's not much of a big deal to me. If you think that the dish could stand a splash of wine, go for it. Serve on a bed of rice and eat away.

    Once you get the hang of "winging it" with wok cooking, you'll get a mental cookbook going. You might think that the carrots taste wonderful with fresh ginger, but that if you've got a lot of green peppers and onions that you want to use up, your tastes might run toward curry as a main seasoning. I mention those choices, because personally, if I have left-over poultry to cook up, I lean to onions, green pepper, and curry, and with a meal made with fresh beef, I tend to run to vegetables with longer cook-times, like carrots, and I like ginger with carrots (don't know why, sorry!).

    Good luck, and just Go For It! What's the worst that can happen? You'll end up with some left-overs that aren't world-class. You might luck out the first time and come up with a meal that is to die for, and then they'll only get better as you gain experience and develop a feel for what combinations most appeal to you.
     
  11. Dec 28, 2007 #10
    [​IMG]


    Relax Wolram, There is a bright sight. Without Sichuan pepper you don't have a Szechuan kitchen, just something else. A fine angelsaksian kitchen for instance. That's all. Consider that now with this thread you have expanded your knowledge on Eastern kitchens tremendously. You may discover many things you never would have.

    And Turbo-1 is right, just go ahead and do it. Don't be afraid.
     
  12. Dec 28, 2007 #11

    turbo

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    Fear paralyzes people who might otherwise be good cooks. They put themselves down, and criticize their own cooking because they tried following a recipe and it came out blah or just plain crappy. News flash!!!! There are a LOT of really crappy recipes out there (and some that are just so-so) that will never taste great no matter how slavishly you follow them. As for the ethnic variations of "Chinese" food that show up in restaurants around the world, well, a lot of that is fiction. Probably some of the best meals served in China are whipped up by people who managed to score a nice fresh fish, some crispy bok-choi and some another vegetable or two. You don't need a huge larder to make wonderful food, but you do need to have a willingness to say "this is what I have today - now what is the evening meal going to be?"

    I am of French-Canadian-Native American heritage on my mother's side and German-Irish-Native American on my father's side, and our favorite family recipes often reflect the need to use foods that have good storage-life in the winter and exploit abundances of wild/home-gardened foods with poor storage qualities as they became more abundant in the summer and fall. The fact that my parents grew up during the depression and never wasted anything probably helped, too. We lived frugally, and ate like kings.

    My appreciation for Chinese-style cooking emanates from this upbringing. If you currently have an abundance of green beans, baby beets, and new potatoes, find a way to make them not only palatable, but wonderful. If you substitute a couple of big cast-iron frying pans and a stainless-steel pot for the wok, the there is little difference in style. Watching my mother throw together a gourmet meal from the most modest ingredients was like watching Martha Graham dance.
     
  13. Dec 29, 2007 #12

    wolram

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    I have a kitchen from hell, when put the chill is in the pan it was like a gas attack, i had to run outside, i was coughing for 10 minutes.
     
  14. Dec 29, 2007 #13

    turbo

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    Heat tends to "weaponize" chilies and if you are not used to working with the real hot ones, it can be irritating. When I'm making habanero relishes, the kitchen is a zippy place to be. In retrospect, I should have warned you not to lean over the wok when you add chilies to the hot oil. You probably got a pretty good shot of the hot stuff when you did that. Sorry...:frown:
     
  15. Dec 29, 2007 #14

    wolram

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    Hey i have to learn and the hard way is the quickest, so no way say sorry, i must admit my guardian angel has to work overtime.
     
  16. Dec 29, 2007 #15

    turbo

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    Well, I'm still sorry. Adding hot chilies like habaneros, scotch bonnets, etc to hot oil (ESPECIALLY if they are finely-divided and juicy) releases capsaicin pretty liberally. I'm pretty used to handling chilies and never gave it a thought.
     
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