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Force field integration

  1. Oct 26, 2015 #1
    A force field is maintained around point O, a particle with mass m is experiencing a force F in the force field. F as a function of the particle's distance from O is: F = cos(d/5) How does one go about looking for the final velocity of the particle if it began at rest at a negligible distance away from point O?
     
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  3. Oct 26, 2015 #2

    andrewkirk

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    Calculate the work done on the particle by the force in moving it to distance d away from O. Then find the velocity at which the mass has that kinetic energy.
     
  4. Oct 26, 2015 #3
    Absolutely. That is the way to go. The only question I have is, what exactly does the statement of the problem mean by the word, "negligible distance".?
     
  5. Oct 26, 2015 #4

    andrewkirk

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    In practice it means you can use zero as the lower limit for your integration. I expect the reason they said 'negligible distance' rather than 'start at O' is that usually when forces are symmetrically arranged around a point it's because there's a particle at that point, and two particles can't occupy the same point in classical phycics.
     
  6. Oct 26, 2015 #5
    Ah! So the particle is moving effectively from 0 to d?
     
  7. Oct 26, 2015 #6

    andrewkirk

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    Yes, I think that is the intent of the question.
     
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