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Force fields?

  1. Jan 20, 2006 #1
    I am an aspiring science fiction writer. By training I'm a psychologist, so my knowledge of physics is somewhat limited. (I like understatement.) In the story I am currently writing, I have a military base surrounded by a force field, which I assume would be some sort of EM field. If I set up my commandos with a mobile EM emitter and have them set it to the same frequency as the base field, would they be able to pass through? If not, what could they do instead and still maintain secrecy?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 20, 2006 #2
    I would make it a glass dome cleaned by that new windex paper towel. Only the base guards would know where the hatch is and everyone else woule bounce off it all confused.
     
  4. Jan 20, 2006 #3
    An EM field isn't likely to keep out neutral matter (i.e., people), unless it's strong enough to strip electrons from atoms in folks getting too close.
     
  5. Jan 20, 2006 #4

    Astronuc

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    To reduce the field strength one would need to use and EM field of opposite polarity and some periodicity (frquency), and this would be detectable.

    The only way to pass through a field undetected is to establish a volume (path) such that the field strength bounday conditions match the unperturbed field, or that the perturbation of the field is less than the noise/disturbance tolerance of the monitoring system.
     
  6. Jan 20, 2006 #5

    ZapperZ

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    It also will not stop my high-powered THz laser from my compact SASE FEL.

    Force fields in most sci-fiction novels and movies are over-rated.

    Zz.
     
  7. Jan 20, 2006 #6
    Thanks to all of you. You have given me much to think about. I wondered about the ability of an EM field to stop something neutral. An EM field would stop a charged particle beam, wouldn't it?
     
  8. Jan 20, 2006 #7

    Astronuc

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    In a way - a magnetic field deflects ions - so it would disperse an ion beam. The charged particle beam cannot travel far without some intervening magnetic field to refocus it. The charges repel each other. The solution would be neutral beam - but then one has to deal with atmospheric dispersion.

    :rofl:

    This stuff takes me back to the days of the real Star Wars / SDI. :rolleyes: :rofl:
     
  9. Jan 20, 2006 #8

    Ivan Seeking

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    No no no, you produce and direct gravito-photons via your handy-dandy Heim Force generator [from Ronco], and that causes a force to act on any mass that approaches the base. The closer it gets to the base the greater the force [Heim collimator are a bugger]. The way to counter the effect is to produce your own gravito-photons, but energy is a problem for mobile forces as compared to that of the base. However, they have to scan a large field with their gravito-photon beam, and you only have to sustain the counter force power demand [and the tidal forces acting on the mass] from the pulse for a few microseconds each second.

    Right, Zapper? :biggrin:
     
  10. Jan 20, 2006 #9

    ZapperZ

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    But I'm sure you all know that all of these things are so 1970's!

    I much prefer to use weapons that use the extra dimensions to transfer their firepower. It circumvents all of these force fields that are only restricted to the 3D space. By making use of the extra dimensions that gravity "leaked" into, I can easily sneak in half of an entangled-pair glob, while I keep the other half isolated. By simply manipulating this, I can easily cause the other half of the entangled glob to instantaneously do my bidding.

    Zz.
     
  11. Jan 20, 2006 #10

    Ivan Seeking

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    Drat! Out gedunkened.
     
  12. Jan 20, 2006 #11
    Not really. Rather than direct a horizontal gravito-proton beam at large, you could mine your perimeter with Heim Force mines. Once triggered they exert 20 or 30 g's instantly flatting the enemy into a pancake sort of thing before they can make a sound. These can all also be switched on at will to spoil the trajectory of any particle beams, not to mention ballistic ground weapons.
     
  13. Jan 21, 2006 #12
    Ivan Seeking: what is a Heim Force generator?
     
  14. Jan 21, 2006 #13

    Astronuc

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  15. Jan 21, 2006 #14

    Ivan Seeking

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    Last edited: Jan 21, 2006
  16. Jan 21, 2006 #15
    I though you'd made it up. I think for sci-fi purposes it's better to make up the force you need, and throw some German name on it.
     
  17. Jan 22, 2006 #16

    Ivan Seeking

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    :surprised :surprised :surprised

    Heathen

    Really though, if I was serious about trying to write Sci-Fi using the Heim stuff, it would take a lot of study and thought. I was just shooting from the hip for fun.
     
  18. Jan 22, 2006 #17
    Zoobyshoe: That's the problem with so much s.f.: we make things up and throw some weird sounding name on it. The problem often occurs, however, that you folks who really have an understanding of science look at our work and go: "Oh come on!" Good s.f. develops out of known science: and is scrupulous in not violating known laws. That's why I asked for help here.
     
  19. Jan 22, 2006 #18
    Actually most sci fi doesn't use much if any real science. Look at some of the most popular sci fi writers out there such as Philip K Dick who more or less used an odd psuedo-futuristic setting for his stories utilizing virtually no real science what so ever. William Gibson knew nothing about computers when he first started writing and is the father of "cyberpunk".
    Hard Sci Fi is practically a seperate genre. Greg Bear is the only example of Hard Sci Fi I know of personally.
     
  20. Jan 22, 2006 #19

    Ivan Seeking

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    Arthur Clarke used [uses] so much real science that he basically invented geostationary orbit, hence the communications satellite - hence the Clarke Belt.
     
  21. Jan 22, 2006 #20

    Ivan Seeking

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    I have seen the three laws of robotics referenced by artificial intelligence gurus.
     
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