Force on a lifted object

  • Thread starter yyttr2
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  • #1
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Is the force done on a lifted object equal the weight of the object in newtons times the height lifted?
F=mgh?
I would have used this but I noticed it was the same equation for gravitational potential energy (or just potential energy)...So I thought I would ask you all after failing to find it online.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Doc Al
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Is the force done on a lifted object equal the weight of the object in newtons times the height lifted?
I suspect you meant work instead of force.
F=mgh?
I would have used this but I noticed it was the same equation for gravitational potential energy (or just potential energy)...So I thought I would ask you all after failing to find it online.
Yes, the work you must do to lift an object equals the increase in gravitational potential energy.
 
  • #3
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no, no I was talking about force. I am trying to find the change in gravitational potential energy from a 2.0 object being lifted 3.5 meters.
So I thought I would find Ke at the bottom.


[tex]\sum w=\Delta ke[/tex]

W=F.d

So I want to know if F=mgh
:)

If I am completely full of crap and doing it wrong please tell me o_O
 
  • #4
Doc Al
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W=F.d

So I want to know if F=mgh
No, F = mg (the weight). (Assuming you are doing the minimum work to overcome gravity.)

So W = Fd = mgh.
 
  • #5
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oh, duh xD I feel stupid now. thank you.
 

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