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Forced on the state

  1. Jan 13, 2009 #1

    wolram

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    Just because i have infrequent epileptic episodes, i am not allowed to drive or carry on my job, i think the powers that be are real dick heads, i am fully able to work 99.99% of the time
    yet i am thrown to wolves, every one except the (top brass) want me back at work, they were even ready to give me a minder, all i can say is sod them i will live on other peoples money.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 13, 2009 #2
    Sorry to hear that, Wolram. Would it be a legal problem?
     
  4. Jan 13, 2009 #3
    I imagine the liability issue alone would prevent your work from taking the risk of you getting harmed. So now it is time to come up with your retirement job. I'm thinking something like working on small engines or electric motors. I know you live in a very small community, but you might want to ask around, to see what needs fixed.
     
  5. Jan 13, 2009 #4
    I will say that once a window washer for our apartment building suffered a seizure while on the job... and he fortunately fell only one story and didn't hit his head severely (before the building manager pulled him in through our window). But he confessed he forgot to take his medicine that day (and he worked with a coworker on task, so at least the accident was quickly caught). His condition was known by his company (as well as the fact that he was on seizure meds).

    So your case seems odd (legally even... is there a disability council that could argue on your behalf?). Hey... there's probably a good chance that someone could get a heart attack at work and suffer injury via a drop or fall or have a traffic accident, and someone with high heart attack risk is still allowed to do these tasks, right?

    Or, like hypatia says: make lemons into lemonade.
     
  6. Jan 13, 2009 #5

    wolram

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    I sure am not ready for retirement, and not being able to drive puts the mockers on every or any job i can think of, i was willing to sign a waiver for any accident i had at work, my boss and his boss even came up with a plan for a minder, i mean i helped design, and was solely responsible for some modifications to the production lines, and not boasting can fix most most problems in half the time of others, i just think the top brass is near sighted.
     
  7. Jan 13, 2009 #6

    wolram

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    Thanks Andre, I do not know about the legal side of things, i have never had the law work for me.
     
  8. Jan 13, 2009 #7
    is biking an option? or move to the cities (take buses or subways)?
     
  9. Jan 13, 2009 #8

    wolram

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    Thank you for the thought tim_lou; but even if i move to the city it seems my options are extremely limited, i guess if i could afford to set up a work shop i could make a living, but there is no way i can do that.
    If any one knows a way i could support myself i would be eternally grateful, i can fix most things mechanical, electrical and can fix simple electronic stuff to component level, i can even design stuff, but unfortunately only i know what i mean most times.
     
  10. Jan 13, 2009 #9

    Kurdt

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    Sorry to hear that wolram. With colleges now doing a lot of vocational courses many will consider taking on lecturers that have years of industry experience nowadays. That may be an option depending on your expertise. Check out some local college web sites.
     
  11. Jan 13, 2009 #10
    If you want to do design electronics, and have it be understood by others, my best guess would be some online courses/resources to figure out the standard notations/conventions (Maybe MIT OCW electrical engineering has something that will help?)

    If you want to set up a work shop, then look into leasing equipment, rather than buying it outright. Given that the lessor usually pays for maintenance on equipment, leasing can sometimes end up cheaper, even in the long run.
     
  12. Jan 13, 2009 #11

    wolram

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    Thank you Neo, i must say, i do not want any one to be sorry for me, may be as i am, a bit mad at the powers that be perhaps.
    I am looking if there is some niche i can fill engineering wise, but with the economy as it is the prospects look grim.
    But as they say chin up old boy, i will be blowed if i will live off the state for long.
     
  13. Jan 14, 2009 #12

    matthyaouw

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    Sorry to hear that Wolram. My father is in a similar position and has not been allowed to drive for over 20 years, so I am pretty sure there is no way to get round that legally. What was their reasoning for making you redundant? I wasn't aware you could be forced out of work for it :frown:
     
  14. Jan 14, 2009 #13

    turbo

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    Not a good position to be in, Woolie. I know, because I fully expected to be working over 15 years from now. It sucks to be sidelined at the height of one's earning ability, especially when new opportunities for employment are nil. Good luck, and keep your chin up.
     
  15. Jan 14, 2009 #14

    Kurdt

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    I believe people medically disqualified from driving in the uk are eleigible for concessionary travel cards. Although if I'm right in thinking you live in a village that may not be ideal.
     
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