1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

FOrced Oscillations

  1. Oct 5, 2008 #1
    I was hoping someone could explain damping and forced oscillations. I had a couple of problems I could not do that revolved around these topics because I couldn't figure out which equations to use. Here's an example.


    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Damping is negligible for a 0.155 kg object hanging from a light 6.30 N/m spring. A sinusoidal force with an amplitude of 1.70 N drives the system. At what frequency will the force make the object vibrate with an amplitude of 0.440 m?

    Give higher and lower frequencies.


    2. Relevant equations
    For this I used the forced oscillation equation which is basically

    Amplitude = (Fo/m)/(sqrt ((w^2 - wo^2)^2 + (damping)^2))


    3. The attempt at a solution
    So since it said damping was negligible, the damping part is 0. For wo (omega initial), I used sqrt (k/m) and plugged that in. Fo was given at 1.70N and mass was also given. I solved for omega (two different answers because it is squared) and I got 3.96Hz for the upper but it wasn't correct.





    I was hoping also someone could basically explain what equation is used for these types of problems. There is another one where mass, an equation for external force (F= 3sin(2pit)) and spring constant are given and it asks to find period, amplitude, etc. How do I incorporate the external force? I think this problem and the org problem are hand in hand so if I can figure out one, I can do the other. Any Help would be greatly appreciated!
     
  2. jcsd
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Can you help with the solution or looking for help too?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: FOrced Oscillations
  1. 2d oscillators (Replies: 0)

  2. Period of Oscillations (Replies: 0)

Loading...