Forces Equillibrium Problem

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In summary, to determine the maximum weight of a flowerpot that can be supported without exceeding a cable tension of 50 lb, we use the equations Fnet=ma and Fxnet=TABcos60-TACcos53.1 =0 and Fynet-TABsin60+TACsin53.1-W=0. By setting the x components of the tensions equal, we can determine that the more vertical cable will have a greater tension and thus fail first. Therefore, the maximum weight that can be supported is dependent on the tension of the more vertical cable.
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myoplex11
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Homework Statement


Determine the maximum weight of the flowerpot that can be supported without exceeding a cable tension of 50 lb in either cable AB or AC. Note that the 2 cables make an angle 60 and 53.1 respectively with the horizontal


Homework Equations



Fnet=ma


The Attempt at a Solution


Fxnet=TABcos60-TACcos53.1 =0
Fynet-TABsin60+TACsin53.1-W=0
I don't know how to figure out if 50lb is the tension in cable AB or in AC
 
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  • #2
i worked out the problem by trial and error and found out that the more vertical cable has the tension of 50 why is this so?
 
  • #3
myoplex11 said:
i worked out the problem by trial and error and found out that the more vertical cable has the tension of 50 why is this so?
You have determined that the x components of the 2 tensions must be equal. A little trig will tell you why the cable with the greater angle from the horizontal must have a greater tension than the cable with the smaller angle, and thus, must fail first.
 

Related to Forces Equillibrium Problem

1. What is a Forces Equilibrium Problem?

A Forces Equilibrium Problem is a physics problem that involves analyzing the forces acting on an object to determine if it is in a state of equilibrium or not. Equilibrium means that the object is either at rest or moving at a constant velocity, with all forces canceling each other out.

2. What are the key principles involved in solving a Forces Equilibrium Problem?

The key principles involved in solving a Forces Equilibrium Problem are Newton's First Law of Motion (Law of Inertia), which states that an object will remain at rest or in motion unless acted upon by an external force, and Newton's Second Law of Motion, which states that the sum of all forces acting on an object is equal to its mass multiplied by its acceleration.

3. How do you determine if an object is in equilibrium or not?

To determine if an object is in equilibrium, you need to analyze the forces acting on the object in all directions (horizontal and vertical). If the sum of the forces in each direction is equal to zero, then the object is in equilibrium. If there is a net force in any direction, then the object is not in equilibrium and will either accelerate or decelerate in that direction.

4. How do you calculate the forces in a Forces Equilibrium Problem?

To calculate the forces in a Forces Equilibrium Problem, you need to draw a free-body diagram of the object, labeling all the forces acting on it. Then, using the equations of motion and the principles of equilibrium, you can determine the forces in each direction. It is important to consider the direction and magnitude of each force to accurately solve the problem.

5. What are some real-world applications of Forces Equilibrium Problems?

Forces Equilibrium Problems have many real-world applications, such as determining the forces acting on a bridge to ensure its stability, analyzing the forces on a building during construction to prevent collapse, and calculating the forces on a projectile to accurately aim and hit a target. They are also used in designing structures, vehicles, and machines to ensure they can withstand the forces acting on them.

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