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Forces on a Near-Earth Object

  1. Jul 25, 2010 #1
    Here is a list of some of the forces on an object in the solar system in near-Earth orbit:

    Gravitation - Earth, Sun, Moon, Planets and the Milky Way's Supermassive Black Hole

    Electromagnetic - Earth, Sun, Moon, Planets and the Milky Way's Supermassive Black Hole

    Solar Wind Plasma from the Sun - Variable due to Solar Flares and its 11-year cycle

    Earth' s Atmosphere

    Light, Gamma and X-rays - Sun, Stars, Supernovas and Galaxies



    Please feel free to add or chop up my list.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 25, 2010 #2

    Vanadium 50

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    I think it would be more useful for you to ask questions than to post lists of dubious utility.
     
  4. Jul 25, 2010 #3
    Alright the Stars, Supernovas, Galaxies and Black Hole is going a little too far. I have a valid right to post my list. And it is not "dubious".
     
  5. Jul 25, 2010 #4

    Vanadium 50

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    I think it would be more useful to ask questions. I have no idea what your point is.
     
  6. Jul 25, 2010 #5

    Astronuc

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    "Light, Gamma and X-rays - Sun, Stars, Supernovas and Galaxies" is redundant with "Electromagnetic - Earth, Sun, Moon, Planets and the Milky Way's Supermassive Black Hole", and a supermassive black hole is about gravity, not EM, unless one is referring to the EM from matter surrounding the BH.

    What does one mean by 'near-earth object'. LEO and GEO are near-earth distances, but the atmosphere is a more significant factor for LEO than GEO, and there's essentially no atmosphere at GEO, but rather the solar wind is more significant. Effects from other stars/galaxies are negligible, and more or less isotropic.

    Other than a list of natural phenomena, it's not clear to us one's objective.
     
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