Forces on Materials Homework: Q&A & Examples

In summary, we discussed the concept of alternating load as a type of force on materials, along with examples of static, dynamic, impact, fatigue, and alternating load forces. We also mentioned the limits of Hooke's Law and the appearance of a Hooke's Law graph.
  • #1
kai92
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Homework Statement


Some question about forces on materials:
1.What is "alternating load"?
2.What are the effect of forces (static,dynamic,impact,fatigue & alternating load) on materials?(Give an example for each force)
3.What are the limits of Hooke's Law?How does the graphs look like?

Please help me by answering them here or give me link of website contain information I needed.Thank you.

Homework Equations


The Attempt at a Solution

 
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  • #2
1. Alternating load is a type of force applied to a material that alternates between two directions, as opposed to a single, static force.2. Static Force: When a material is under a static force, it will remain in a constant state of tension and compression, depending on the direction of the force. For example, a bridge will experience a static force from the weight of the cars crossing it.Dynamic Force: When a material is subject to a dynamic force, it will experience changes in both its tension and compression, but in alternating directions. An example of a dynamic force on a material would be a bridge experiencing an earthquake.Impact Force: Impact forces are sudden, large forces that cause a material to deform rapidly. An example of an impact force on a material would be an object hitting a wall.Fatigue Force: Fatigue forces are repeated loads that cause a material to fail over time. An example of a fatigue force on a material would be the regular use of a bridge, causing it to deteriorate over time.Alternating Load: Alternating loads are forces that alternate between two directions, as opposed to a single, static force. An example of an alternating load on a material would be a bridge experiencing both wind and water pressure from different directions.3. The limits of Hooke's Law are that it only applies to linear materials (i.e., materials that do not undergo plastic deformation), and that it does not account for effects such as temperature and moisture. The graph of a Hooke's Law relationship looks like a straight line, with the slope representing the elastic modulus.
 

Related to Forces on Materials Homework: Q&A & Examples

1. What are some examples of forces on materials?

Some examples of forces on materials include tension, compression, shear, bending, and torsion.

2. What is tension and how does it affect materials?

Tension is a force that pulls on a material, causing it to stretch. It can cause materials to become longer and thinner, and can eventually lead to failure or breakage if the material is unable to withstand the force.

3. What is compression and how does it affect materials?

Compression is a force that pushes on a material, causing it to become shorter and thicker. It can lead to buckling or crushing of the material if it is unable to withstand the force.

4. How does shear force affect materials?

Shear force is a force that acts parallel to the surface of a material, causing it to slide or deform. It can cause materials to shear or tear if the force is too great.

5. How do external forces impact the strength of materials?

External forces, such as weight or pressure, can affect the strength of materials by putting stress on them. Depending on the type and magnitude of the force, it can cause materials to deform, break, or fail. Stronger materials are able to withstand higher external forces without failing.

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