Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Formulas ^_^

  1. Feb 17, 2004 #1
    I was just wondering if anyone here , knows a good site (or a book) for general Formulas for Celestial Mechanics ? I have looked a little, But I only find one or two equations per site, and most of them are the same, So if you do know one that would be great
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 17, 2004 #2

    enigma

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Welcome to the forums, Ravine!

    How far does your math education go?

    Fundamentals of Astrodynamics and Applications by David A. Vallado is the book which is used for the senior level 'Orbital Dynamics' and 'Space Navigation and Guidance' classes at my school.

    It has just about anything you could possibly want to learn about.
     
  4. Feb 18, 2004 #3
    Hey thanks enigma ^_^.
    My math level is Grade 12+ (Though I am in Gr. 10, lol) Even if it is a bit hard, I am sure I can pick it up fast . Well, I best be off to the library to rent these books before they close ^_^
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2004
  5. Feb 18, 2004 #4

    enigma

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    If you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask.
     
  6. Feb 19, 2004 #5
    Well, Thanks for your help, but it seems my library did not have the book in stock. So I will have to order it from the internet. I just can not wait the 2-3 weeks -_-, lol.
     
  7. Feb 19, 2004 #6

    chroot

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    What library did you go to? A public library won't have it, but any university library with an aerospace engineering program will. In addition, a well-stocked college bookstore should have it, too.

    - Warren
     
  8. Feb 19, 2004 #7

    enigma

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I don't think you should buy the book until you at least look through it to see if it's something you can handle. The book is too expensive to jump in without taking a look inside first... I'm willing to bet it is much more complicated math-wise than anything you've seen.
     
  9. Jun 6, 2004 #8

    Jenab

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Transfer orbits made easy

    I can teach transfer orbits so a high school student can understand it. Nothing to it.

    Jerry Abbott
     
  10. Jun 6, 2004 #9

    selfAdjoint

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Gold Member
    Dearly Missed

    And we're darn lucky to have you with us! Have you thought about an online course?
     
  11. Jun 6, 2004 #10

    Jenab

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Shucks, I'll do it here! Or, rather, in a new thread.

    OK it's done! See the thread with the title: "Transfer orbits for dummies: a hillbilly tutorial."

    I got the job done fast because I'd already solved that particular example problem while I was working out the math of the theory. But I used more recent orbital elements this time, and the transit time didn't come out quite right for the elliptical transfer orbit. Oh well.

    Jerry Abbott
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2004
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Formulas ^_^
  1. G formula? (Replies: 12)

  2. Jeans mass - Formula (Replies: 2)

  3. LST formula (Replies: 13)

Loading...