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Homework Help: Formulas I have learned in my pre-AP physics class

  1. Dec 7, 2004 #1
    Here are all the formulas I have learned in my pre-AP physics class so far, I just finished the 1st semester:
    They are in no particular order.

    [tex]F_c = \frac {mv^2}{r}[/tex]

    [tex]a_c = \frac {v^2}{r}[/tex]

    [tex]F_F = \mu * F_N[/tex]

    [tex]C = 2 * \pi * r[/tex]

    [tex]V_f = V_i + at[/tex]

    [tex]V_f^2 = V_i^2 + 2ad[/tex]

    [tex]d = V_i * t + \frac {1}{2} * at^2[/tex]

    [tex]d = \frac {1}{2} (V_f + V_i) * t[/tex]

    [tex]v = \frac {d}{t}[/tex]

    [tex]F = ma[/tex]

    [tex]F = \frac {G * m_1 * m_2}{r^2}[/tex]

    [tex]g = \mu * a[/tex]

    [tex]g = \frac {Gm}{r^2}[/tex]

    [tex]v_o = \sqrt {\frac {Gm}{r}}[/tex]

    [tex]P.E. = mgh[/tex]

    [tex]W = Fd[/tex]

    [tex]K.E. = \frac {1}{2} * mv^2[/tex]

    KEY
    [tex]F_c[/tex] = centripital force
    [tex]a_c[/tex] = centripital acceleration
    m = mass
    v = velocity
    r = radius
    [tex]F_F[/tex] = frictional force
    [tex]F_N[/tex] = normal force(weight)
    [tex]\mu[/tex] = coefficient of friction
    C = circumference
    [tex]V_f[/tex] = final velocity
    [tex]V_i[/tex] = initial velocity
    a = acceleration
    d = distance
    g = acceleration due to gravity
    t = time
    G = gravitational constant
    P.E. = potential energy
    K.E. = kinetic energy
    W = work

    some important values:
    mass of the earth = [tex]5.98 * 10^24 kg[/tex]
    radius of the earth = [tex]6.38 * 10^6 km[/tex]
    radius of the moon = [tex]1.74 * 10^3 km[/tex]
    mass of the moon = [tex]7.35 * 10^35 kg[/tex]
    gravitational constant = [tex]6.67 * 10^-11 \frac {N*m^2}{kg^2}[/tex]

    Feel free to add anything or make suggestions. I will add more as the year goes on. I hope this helps some of you.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2004
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 7, 2004 #2
    You mean gravitational constant.
     
  4. Dec 7, 2004 #3

    dextercioby

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    The gravitational constant a.k.a. Cavendish's constant IS THE GRAVITATIONAL FORCE WITH WHICH 2 BODIES OF 1Kg EACH SITUATED AT A DISTANCE OF OF 1m ATTRACT EACH OTHER.

    That's how those words got there instead of "gravitational/Cavendish's constant".Via a simple dictionary-type definition.Unfortunately,it weren't all,just the first 2 which would lead to an erroneous statement.

    Congratulations,Nylex!!Apparently statistical mechanics and Cavendish's constant have nothing in common,or do they...??I'll let u think about it.

    PS Sorry for being cynical.
     
  5. Dec 7, 2004 #4
    there i fixed it
     
  6. Dec 7, 2004 #5
    This could be helpful as a sticky, I see so many people stuck just because they don't know a formula (especially basic kinematic ones !). If it's online, a link to the AP B and C formula sheets would be helpful too, as it is basically what Triumph posted.
     
  7. Dec 7, 2004 #6
    i did a quick google search and found this
     
  8. Dec 8, 2004 #7
    if this doesnt get stickied, nobody's even gonna see it with many new threads being created every day
     
  9. Dec 8, 2004 #8
    [tex]v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{R}}[/tex]

    [tex]v_e[/tex] is the escape velocity
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2004
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