Fossil and rock identification

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Evo
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A number of people have said they are interested in this topic.

Please posts any pictures, information or questions about rocks or fossils here.

I'll start off with some odd formations in rock here from the Pennsylvanian period (318.1 to 299.0 mya).

They appear to be strips of wood, but why do they always appear as strips, no depth? I can't find anything online. I'm dating them by the fossils found in the rock with them.
 

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  • #2
Evo
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Sorry, I need to upload these to a webhosting site and resize them.
 
  • #3
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Ok, more.

This is a block of wood in stone from the same era as above.
 

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  • #4
Evo
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Small fossils, including what appears to be a fern leaf I found in an ancient river bed.

attachment.php?attachmentid=51090&d=1348292684.jpg
 

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  • #5
DrDu
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Interesting thread!
So that is from the period when the variscean orogenesis took place?
 
  • #6
Evo
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Interesting thread!
So that is from the period when the variscean orogenesis took place?
Yes, in Kansas , we had many periods at and below sea level, and we were below the equator at the time.
 
  • #7
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Just a note, I know pretty little about fossils, but I believe it is standard practice to put a "scale bar" in to pictures. Rocks can be notoriously 'self-similar', meaning that it can be very difficult at times to know from pictures whether you are looking at an angular pebble, or an angular mountain top! That is, unless of course, there is a sense of scale. A simple coin, or other well known object usually suffices for fossils.
 
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Evo
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Just a note, I know pretty little about fossils, but I believe it is standard practice to put a "scale bar" in to pictures. Rocks can be notoriously 'self-similar', meaning that it can be very difficult at times to know from pictures whether you are looking at an angular pebble, or an angular mountain top! That is, unless of course, there is a sense of scale. A simple coin, or other well known object usually suffices for fossils.
HEY! *I* know how big they are!

Good idea. Ok, so I just got back from risking my life hanging off the edge of a cliff while holding a camera just so I could place a nickel next to the odd wood-like strips. Ok, I wasn't hanging, but I did have to lean in an awkward position on the boulder and it IS on the edge of an overhang.

attachment.php?attachmentid=51108&d=1348334740.jpg
 

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Evo
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These "strips" are everywhere, what are they?
 
  • #10
turbo
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Most of the fossils in this area contain simple bivalves from when this place was under sea-water, however I still have my anti-gravity fossil rock from the Alpha Centauri system.

floatingfossil_comt.jpg
 
  • #11
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HEY! *I* know how big they are!

Good idea. Ok, so I just got back from risking my life hanging off the edge of a cliff while holding a camera just so I could place a nickel next to the odd wood-like strips. Ok, I wasn't hanging, but I did have to lean in an awkward position on the boulder and it IS on the edge of an overhang.

attachment.php?attachmentid=51108&d=1348334740.jpg
*Much* better. :smile:

I still don't know what they are though :redface:
 
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  • #12
Evo
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This one is a real shame, what a nice brachiopod specimen it would have been.
 

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  • #13
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Most of the fossils in this area contain simple bivalves from when this place was under sea-water, however I still have my anti-gravity fossil rock from the Alpha Centauri system.

floatingfossil_comt.jpg
I love your "anti-grav" rock!
 
  • #14
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A number of people have said they are interested in this topic.

Please posts any pictures, information or questions about rocks or fossils here.

I'll start off with some odd formations in rock here from the Pennsylvanian period (318.1 to 299.0 mya).

They appear to be strips of wood, but why do they always appear as strips, no depth? I can't find anything online. I'm dating them by the fossils found in the rock with them.
Do you think they look like these Calamites?
 
  • #15
Evo
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Some rocks.

attachment.php?attachmentid=51113&d=1348348723.jpg


attachment.php?attachmentid=51115&d=1348349649.jpg
 

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  • #16
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  • #17
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This is what I call "swimming yams". Any guesses?
 

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That's it!! Thank you!!
That's exciting! You gave a lot of good information to help track it down. Any more info on the swimming yams?
 
  • #19
Evo
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That's exciting! You gave a lot of good information to help track it down. Any more info on the swimming yams?
Notice the empty indentations? That's where yams fell out.

Normally, the fossils are the usual hard white substance. But I have found a large number of rocks recently where the fossils are of a soft, crumbly orange substance. These are all from this area, both the white and the orange. I'm wondering what the orange yam like fossils could be.

Here's an orange fossil of possibly a crinoid?
 

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  • #20
Evo
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Can anyone identify this type of rock and what caused the pits?
 

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  • #21
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Can anyone identify this type of rock and what caused the pits?
A guess, maybe those are calcite etch pits

Calcite (if it's that) will dissolve slowly in rain water (chemical weathering) which is slightly acid (due to carbonic acid - dissolved carbon dioxide) and little dents may grow out to pits. There is not a lot of literature about it.

http://www.limestone-pavements.org.uk/geology.html
http://www.essc.psu.edu/~brantley/publications/dislocations.pdf[/URL]
 
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  • #22
DrDu
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Can anyone identify this type of rock and what caused the pits?
A coral may be?
 
  • #23
Evo
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Thanks, both of you. I've been reading that similar holes are formed in rocks when iron ore they contained dissolved. Iron might also explain the reddish discoloration on the rock surface. I'm still searching, the rock is heavy, solid, and very hard, so far, I've ruled out calcite.

I have more rocks I need to post so please keep the ideas coming.
 
  • #24
dlgoff
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Okay. I finally bought a "point and shoot". Here's my first two photos.

http://imageshack.us/a/img442/3152/arrowheads1.jpg [Broken]

http://imageshack.us/a/img18/2004/arrowheads2.jpg [Broken]

All of these where found in Arkansas with the exception of the middle one on the bottom row of the first picture, which was found in Kansas.
 
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  • #25
Evo
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Very nice dl!!
 

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