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Free body diagrams

  1. Feb 7, 2005 #1
    Hi all,

    For an online physics assignment I have a question about a block resting on a slope. The question asks what forces are acting on the block.. and I was thinking normal and weight force? But it turned out to be incorrect...

    list of possibilities to choose from
    weight
    kinetic friction
    static friction
    force of push
    normal force
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 7, 2005 #2

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    If the block is resting on the slope, what does that tell you?
     
  4. Feb 7, 2005 #3
    Does it mean that there are no forces acting on it? I don't know, I don't get this stuff.
     
  5. Feb 7, 2005 #4
    or static friction maybe?
     
  6. Feb 7, 2005 #5

    Doc Al

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    It means that the net force on the object is zero. So what additional force is needed to balance the component of the weight acting down the slope?
     
  7. Feb 7, 2005 #6
    normal force?
     
  8. Feb 7, 2005 #7

    Doc Al

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    No. The normal force is perpendicular to the surface of the slope, so it cannot act to balance out a force parallel to the surface.
     
  9. Feb 7, 2005 #8
    So could the static force balance out the forces?
     
  10. Feb 7, 2005 #9

    Doc Al

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    Absolutely! If there were no friction, the object would slide down the slope.
     
  11. Feb 7, 2005 #10
    Thanks...

    as my answer I put down weight and static friction, but turns out that was wrong because the answer also includes normal force. Oh well.....
     
  12. Feb 7, 2005 #11

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    Yes. Three forces act on the object.
     
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