Free electron density conduction band

In summary, the number of free electrons in the conduction band of diamond can be calculated using the Fermi-Dirac distribution equation with the Fermi energy taken to be halfway between the conduction band minimum and valence band maximum. The effective mass can be found in reference books or online databases, and for diamond, it is approximately 0.2 times the mass of an electron. The number of free electrons at room temperature can vary depending on temperature and doping levels, and a higher number can lead to better conductivity and device performance.
  • #1
Kara386
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2

Homework Statement


How many free electrons are there in the CB? Diamond has a bandgap of ##5.5##eV.Assume the material is at room temperature and that there are ##2 \times 10^{22}## cm##^{-3}## electrons in the material. What does this mean for their use in semiconductor devices?

Homework Equations

The Attempt at a Solution


Probably I should use something like this equation:
##n = N_c \exp\left(\frac{E_F - E_C}{kT}\right)##
Where ##N_c = \frac{8\pi\sqrt{2}m^{*3/2}}{h^3}\sqrt{E-E_c} ## is the effective density of states, and then multiply by the number of electrons in the material cm##^{-3}##. But there's quantities in there I don't know and can't calculate, like the Fermi energy (although is that half the gap?), and the energy of the conduction band, and the effective mass. I feel like this should be a simple question, but I can't see how to do it. It's possible, although unlikely, that I just have to look these quantities up, but if there's any other way I'd rather not do that. Thanks for any help! :)
 
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  • #2


Hi there!
Yes, you are on the right track. The equation you have mentioned is known as the Fermi-Dirac distribution, and it describes the probability of finding an electron at a given energy level in a semiconductor. To calculate the number of free electrons in the conduction band, you can use the following equation:

##n = N_c \exp\left(\frac{E_F - E_C}{kT}\right)##

As you have correctly pointed out, the Fermi energy (E_F) is typically taken to be halfway between the conduction band minimum (E_C) and the valence band maximum (E_V). In this case, the Fermi energy in diamond will be 2.75 eV. The value of the effective mass (m*) can be found in reference books or online databases, and for diamond, it is approximately 0.2 times the mass of an electron.

Using these values, you can calculate the number of free electrons in the conduction band at room temperature. However, it is important to note that this number may vary depending on the temperature and doping levels of the semiconductor. In general, a higher number of free electrons in the conduction band can lead to better conductivity and improved performance in semiconductor devices. I hope this helps!
 

Related to Free electron density conduction band

1. What is free electron density in the conduction band?

Free electron density in the conduction band refers to the number of unbound electrons that are able to move freely within a material's conduction band. These electrons are not attached to any specific atom and are responsible for the material's ability to conduct electricity.

2. How is free electron density related to electrical conductivity?

Free electron density is directly related to electrical conductivity. The higher the free electron density, the higher the electrical conductivity of a material. This is because the free electrons are able to move more freely, allowing them to carry an electric current more easily.

3. What factors affect the free electron density in a material?

The free electron density in a material can be affected by a number of factors, including the type of material, its temperature, and the presence of impurities or defects. In general, metals tend to have higher free electron densities compared to non-metals.

4. How is free electron density measured?

Free electron density can be measured using various techniques, such as Hall effect measurements, resistivity measurements, and electron diffraction. These methods involve applying an electric field and measuring the resulting current or resistance, which can then be used to calculate the free electron density.

5. Why is understanding free electron density important in materials science?

Understanding free electron density is crucial in materials science because it helps explain the electrical and thermal properties of different materials. It also plays a significant role in the design and development of electronic devices and materials for various applications, such as semiconductors and conductors.

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