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  • Thread starter mcknia07
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  • #26
Evo
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To say MSG is bad and should not be used for the normal public because some people claim it bothers them is to say that milk is bad and should not be used by the public because some people are lactose intolerant. :rolleyes:

At least lactose intolerance has been proven.

And my BP was 185/100 yesterday. And I didn't die. I didn't even feel unusual. The doctor yelled at me to remember my BP medicine though. High systolic (the top number) pressure is a sign of anxiety. It can be raised if you are having an anxiety attack, are in pain, or have been exercising. It's the lower number that is indicative of heart disease. If your systolic BP is going up acutely, I would think panic attack. Perhaps you could try something like ativan the next time you smell something that panics you, it could work.
 
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  • #27
turbo
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To say MSG is bad and should not be used for the normal public because some people claim it bothers them is to say that milk is bad and should not be used by the public because some people are lactose intolerant. :rolleyes:
I will gladly provide evidence that when "some people claim" it bothers them, they are describing life-threatening situations when ER personnel are scrambling. If you choose to believe Archer-Daniels-Midland, and other agri-businesses, that's your prerogative, but their "peer-reviewed studies" mean nothing. When I was having asthma problems in a work-place, the workers-comp insurance company had my case reviewed by a doctor who participated in a "study" that had found that people with asthma never had any trouble with tobacco smoke, and that their complaints were "subjective" only. We know that tobacco smoke can be a pretty powerful trigger in asthmatics, yet Jon Musmand is willing to sign on for $2000/per hour to nay-say any doctor that tries to protect the health of their patients.
 
  • #28
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I get migraines when I am exposed to fragrance chemicals and when I ingest glutamates.
How do you react to caffein?
 
  • #30
turbo
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How do you react to caffein?
It can help alleviate asthma and can help tamp down my reactions to MSG, but those are slow-reacting and are not as reliable as other drugs. Epinephrine works pretty well, but I hate to use it because it makes me feel like I'm going to bust. I have bought and discarded years' worth of Epi-pen auto-injectors to have it on hand while dreading the side-effects.
 
  • #31
turbo
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turbo, have you seen a psychiatrist? Your condition could be easily treatable with anti-anxiety medications. It could mean you can get back to a regular life without fear.

http://ww1.cpa-apc.org:8080/publications/archives/Bulletin/2003/april/binkley.asp
Are you qualified to pass out medical advice here? I have been treated by probably the most respected respiratory specialist in Maine and arguably the most highly-qualified chemical-injury specialist (currently teaching and practicing at Dartmouth-Hitchcock) in the Northeast and perhaps in the country. You can keep your home-grown diagnoses to yourself, thank you.
 
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  • #32
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Turbo, I recall you saying the papermill you worked at years ago had nasty chemicals that caused alot of health related problems in workers there. I wonder if your sensitivity to fragrances is a result from working at the plant? Have you ever considered this?
 
  • #33
Evo
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Are you qualified to pass out medical advice here? I have been treated by probably the most respected respiratory specialist in Maine and arguably the most highly-qualified chemical-injury specialist (currently teaching and practicing at Dartmouth-Hitchcock) in the Northeast and perhaps in the country. You can keep your home-grown diagnoses to yourself, thank you.
I'm just saying that they can't find anything physical to treat and it's ruining your life, you should not rule out that it's psychiatric and can easily be treated with anti-anxiety medicines. You mentioned once, I believe, that you were told you had MCS (multiple chemical sensitivity) which is considered a psychiatric condition, reclassified now as IEI (Idiopathic environmental intolerance). It's nothing to be embarrassed about, it's not something you can control on your own, it can be treated with medication.

It's awful to see you back yourself into a hole when routinely available anti-anxiety medicines would make you feel normal again. You should go and get evaluated. It might be the best thing you've ever done. If you try them and they don't work, then at least you've tried, I wouldn't give up just because they can't find a physical cause to treat.

You're a lovely person, and I hate seeing you this way. Don't rule out anxiety attacks.
 
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  • #34
turbo
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Turbo, I recall you saying the papermill you worked at years ago had nasty chemicals that caused alot of health related problems in workers there. I wonder if your sensitivity to fragrances is a result from working at the plant? Have you ever considered this?
Certainly, Cy. There is no knowing what ended up in the waste-products of a Kraft-digestion pulp mill, and some of the organic chemicals in plants have proven to be very potent agents in human health. We know that a camphor compound (now known as taxol) can help suppress some cancers - how many others can cause or accelerate cancers? That will never be known. Nobody will pursue epidemiology studies for a small group of workers.
 
  • #35
cristo
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This thread's gone way off topic, so I think it's time to close it.
 

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