Freezing a Clock

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Fairly Simple Question:

If a clock, I suppose ideally an atomic clock, is cooled to near a Absolute Zero, does the cooling process have any impact on its ability to keep time accurately?

If not, what types of clocks would be impacted by the cooling process? I assume any clock that uses a battery at a minimum due to freezing of the chemicals in the battery. I assume a mechanical clock would also be impacted by the cold, but am curious about the specific reasons. I assume it would have something to do with any necessary springs and similar no longer functioning correctly due to the cooling.
 

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anorlunda
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If a clock, I suppose ideally an atomic clock, is cooled to near a Absolute Zero, does the cooling process have any impact on its ability to keep time accurately?
The physics of the clock are not affected by temperature. However, the digital electronic chips may stop working. LCD dispays must stay liquid or they don't dispalay.

I assume any clock that uses a battery at a minimum due to freezing of the chemicals in the battery.
Many batteries have poor or no performance in the cold. It depends on what kind of battery. If battery performance is bad, the clock stops working entirely. LCD dispays must stay liquid or they don't dispalay.

I assume a mechanical clock would also be impacted by the cold,
Mechanical clocks need lubrication. Most lubricants (like oil) gum up when cold, so the clock stops.
 
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DrClaude
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The question seems to be rehashing what was already answered in the thread https://www.physicsforums.com/threads/absolute-zero-v-the-speed-of-light.967047/

As was said there, temperature does not affect the passage of time. In atomic clocks, atoms are cooled down as much as possible to reduce uncertainties. If physicists could build an atomic clock based on an atom at absolute zero, they would.

As @anorlunda said, freezing the entire atomic clock would result in it not working, as some components cannot function normally at such low temperatures.

This is now settled and we will not allow any more discussion of the topic.

Thread closed.
 
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